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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have a 2013 200, 2.4l that recently broke down on my wife & I on the way home. It had overheated the day before, then next day was having trouble accelerating beyond 45mph briefly, up until the moment we were trying to climb a slight incline, during which we were forced to pull over, wife turns the key to off & from then on the vehicle has cranked, then cranked some more, but sadly with little to no sign of anything more. We had the vehicle towed back to the house & then pushed it into the garage where it sits to this very day. Upon reading the initial codes I received:
P0340 camshaft position sensor circuit (immediately replaced both camshaft position sensors, which alleviated that code).
P0013 Bank 1 camshaft 2 position actuator circuit open. I have pulled both the intake, & exhaust solenoid, applied 12v DC current to observe their mechanical operation as well as ensured they are within the correct ohm range for operation. Took measurements where the electrical connector & solenoid meet, which leads me to my first question.. at said connection, with the key in ON position, how many DC volts should my multimeter be reading?...btw (Have checked the ground shared by both solenoids & found >1 ohm resistance).
P0117 P2181 P0298 Initially saved to my scanner, but since clearing codes while working on the car & attempting to start have not since returned.
P0440 P0441 P0456 P0457 All EVAP related codes in which I have replaced the gas cap, pulled the EVAP canister itself to ensure it was not fully clogged, & pulled the EVAP canister purge solenoid which was not within the specified range, replaced it.
P0197 Engine oil temperature sensor circuit low
P0113 Intake air temperature sensor 1 circuit high

I'm currently working my way through my HANES manual Engine rotates but will not start, troubleshooting checklist as follows..
1. Fuel Tank Empty.... was around 1/2 when the 200 gave out, have since added gas & is now over 3/4 so... check
2.Battery Discharged......Had the battery load tested at AutoZone, as well as trickle charged it on low setting overnight... check
3. Battery terminal connections loose or corroded... Pulled both, as well as remote jump post terminals, cleaned with baking soda/water solution then assured each was tightened properly... check
4. Leaking Fuel Injectors, fuel pump, pressure regulator... currently working on this one, disconnected then connected fuel pressure gauge at the fuel rail & cranked the car (fuel pressure reached the desired 58psi, but quickly drops to around 30 psi once the car stops cranking) I'm curious.. the test is meant to be done at idle, then observed several minutes after turning off the car.. I'm dealing with a no start condition currently so I cant actually let the car idle, then turn it off and make observations as the book states.. is this why the fuel pressure is dropping so quickly (because it never stabilizes) or can I count on the reading being accurate despite not being able to actually start the engine?
5. Fuel not reaching the injection system... stuck the fuel line that connects to the fuel rail into a mcdonalds LG cup, which it promptly filled within a second of turning the key to ON, as well as removed the fuel rail & inspected for obstruction... so, check?
6.Broken timing belt or chain.... saving this one for never, i sincerely hope
7. Ignition System problem.... spark tester lit up between each coil/plug, replaced the plugs anyway as they were probably overdue, pulled the starter, bench tested it & it passed.
8.Defective crankshaft sensor/camshaft sensor.... replaced the cam sensors as stated earlier in response to the p0340 code, which was cleared in response. Haven't had any related crank sensor codes BUT I was cruising this same forum & noticed a thread from last year about an overheating 200, 2012 model, but same 2.4l engine, same codes from what i could tell, even down to the same EVAP, oil & air sensor codes, as well as a shared occurrence in which the cam sensors were melted (that car had melted crank sensor as well) so despite having no codes I plan to check my crank sensor asap as 1 of my 2 cam sensors was slightly melted.. but according to the obd I'm going to say... check I'll update shortly if visual inspection of the crank sensor says otherwise.

So, here we are today still cranking strong but without a single sign of starting. By this point I'm feeling slightly overwhelmed with information, I've learned far more than I ever could have imagined by this point & for that I'm thankful, but thankful isn't getting the wife's car back on the road so any insight, advice or etc WOULD BE MOST APPRECIATED at this point. TY in advance!! & also, will be adding a link to the old thread in which someone else had experienced very similar symptoms for reference below.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
 

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Haynes and Chiltons manuals leave a lot to be desired. The factory manual is best, but often are meant to be used along with the factory diagnostic tools. However, many of these tests can be done with a 12 v test light and multimeter. If you understand what the test is looking for, you should be able to measure it, be it in ohms or volts.

Some larger public libraries may have a subscription to Alldata, which gives technicians access to factory service information through a 3rd party for a modest user fee. I support libraries.
Motors and Mitchell manuals may not be as good as factory, but better at doing this kind of work than the Haynes or Chiltons.

The cam and crankshaft position sensors are 5 volt, low-current Hall-effect (on-off) switches. They should not be able to melt plastic connectors.
The starter can crank the engine over, but it will not fire up? 3 things are needed to run an engine: spark, fuel and engine mechanical (compression/valve timing). Can you hear the compression on each cylinder as it cranks over? Is it an even rhythmic-sounding effort with no free-wheeling?

Did you find a reason for overheating? The 2013 should use an OAT-based coolant. Do not mix coolant types.
Some of the fault codes left behind were likely from the overheat. Some may be due to low oil pressure (I take it that the oil level & condition is OK)? The MultiAir valvetrain depends on good oil pressure to open the valves. Is this causing the 'no-start'?

The IAT and EVAP fault codes should not prevent the engine from starting or affect the way it runs. The IAT-high code may have been triggered if the connector was unplugged with the ignition on (like if it was being tested for the 5 volts).
Volts-high or 'short-to-voltage' is a signal 'open circuit'. Volts-low is usually a signal 'short-to-ground'.
A good visual inspection of the engine compartment wiring harness can locate wire breaks (opens) or rub-throughs (shorts).

For diagnosis. I start by looking at the 'Possible Causes' to find out if and what the fault codes all have in common. Multiple codes are usually from a single problem. Multiple problems, while possible are not common.
The PCM is in common with all these codes, but is at the bottom of the list for a reason. The PCM can fail, but is rarely the problem. It is usually the simple, stupid, little things that go bad.
Everything else on the list must be ruled out first before condemning a PCM (or any control module for that matter). A module can only go by what it is told by its sensors. Good power and ground connections are necessary for the module.


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- Continued.
These may be other things to look for. Start with the easy stuff first.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
In theory I support libraries as well, hats off to you for doing so in practice. The one small town library currently at my disposal is less than extensive in selection, so far from my mind in regards to this matter but I will check and see because I have been surprised before. My experience wrenching going into this was minimal, but growing by the day. As far as electrical matters even less so but I do now have a multimeter, test light, alligator clamp test leads and a knowledge base being fed by every free automotive electrical article I can wrap my brain around to aid in this attempt to get the Chrysler back on the road where it belongs.

I apologize if my post was misleading in reference to the camshaft position sensor, the electrical connector was fine but the CMP sensor itself was melted upon removal & inspection. Also, would the electrical connection at the VVT solenoids be receiving a similar 5 volt reference with the key in the ON position? The p0340 code was cleared once I removed the melted sensor, replaced it with a new one & then cleared & re-checked the DTCs after attempting to start the vehicle. I'm having trouble clearing the p0013 code, the solenoid itself checks out, but my question is according to the wiring diagram you supplied in reference to the p0013 code, wire K276 (db/wt) what measurement would be appropriate on my multimeter with the key in ON position? The ground Z909 between the two solenoids checks out at less than 1 ohm resistance.

I'm running to pick up a mechanic's stethoscope shortly, and will investigate further upon my return.

As far as a reason for the overheating I believe it may have been due to a clogged heater core. To offer a little more background information we have not owned the car for long. We knew it had some EVAP issues after checking the DTCs before purchase, which we intended to fix, as well as an issue with the heater core due to thick vapor coming from the vents under the windshield and a lack of heat on either side. The day we got the car home I drained the coolant, back flushed the heater core & replaced with OEM recommended coolant. (The overheating I had referred to happened earlier that day before back flushing then re-filling with the appropriate type/amount of coolant.) This instantly alleviated the overheating issue & stopped the vapor from flowing through the vents. However, the air coming from the vents remains cold.

As to the oil, since the breakdown I have changed the oil/filter & replaced with the appropriate amount & viscosity of oil. In hopes the the p0013 could have been due to improper oil. The oil I changed was very dirty, and in beyond need of a change but lacked the presence of any metal shavings, coolant, or anything other than some slightly concerning sludge. I'm wondering if the VVT solenoid trouble could be coming from an obstruction on the VVT solenoid screens? If they were easier to get to I would have already checked but, haven't been able to find much information at all in regards to the presence or location of vvt screens on this model. I intend to run a more proper check of the wiring leading to/from the solenoids once I know what an appropriate reading would be to rule out that possible scenario.

I believe you are spot on in reference to the IAT codes BC it has in fact been unplugged during testing. One theory I developed last night reading through different diagnosis was could the IAT sensor code be referring to the downstream airflow sensor located in front of the catalytic converter? Could the previous owners neglect to tend to the EVAP codes have potentially damaged or restricted airflow through the catalytic converter, causing the IAT sensor code & even caused the no start as well? The smooth lack of power sounds very similar to what owners with failing cats were experiencing, and maybe now the airflow is restricted to the point its preventing the engine from pulling enough oxygen through due to the restriction downstream, in turn throwing off the air/fuel ratio?
I plan to pull the sensor in front of the catalytic converter, attempt a start, then possibly even pull the converter itself and inspect it/attempt a start in lack of its presence.
I will also inspect the pictured potential trouble spots of the engines wiring to rule out a rub through.

I greatly appreciate the very thorough, & helpful bits you have provided. Thank you very much!! & I hope you don't mind, but I'll most likely be back sooner rather than later to both run a few more things past you & potentially for a second serving of the very useful light you seem to have the ability to shed on this situation. Once again, TYVM.
 

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The sensors use a 5 volt supply from the PCM. The solenoids use a 12 volt pulsating (duty-cycle) supply.
For a stethoscope, I've used a nail stuck into a rubber hose.
Even with a plugged cat it should fire and maybe idle (low air flow), but will have problems under acceleration/open throttle (higher air flow) because of the restriction. It takes a long time to set a cat code (P0420) as everything must pass its self-test first.
There are conical-shaped internal oil screens that are serviced under the head gasket, but I have never had them clog. They are shown in the attached.

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The first thing I read from the OP was quote " It had overheated the day before" ... I have not read the full thread but the first though that came to my mind was to do a compression or leak-down test... You may have a blown head gasket or warped head or block...
Dave
 

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I thought that too. If the engine cranks over with the starter motor, you should be able to 'hear' the compression.
If it has lost compression in one or more cylinders, it will sound like cranking the engine over with one or more spark plugs removed. The starter will 'free-wheel' past the cylinder(s) with low or no compression.
Does the starter cranking-over sound 'different' than it did before the overheat?
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
From what my admittedly inexperienced ears could gather each cylinder appears to sound near enough to the next during cranking, but I could be wrong. While under the car pulling the crankshaft position sensor earlier (which looked fine, no melting or as I found with the camshaft position sensor) I found that the fuel tank vapor line which connects to the bottom of the EVAP canister purge solenoid had 2 holes rubbed through. Fixed the hose temporarily with a JB Weld fiber weld automotive repair cast until my replacement hose is in. Hopefully that will be the last of the issues causing the 4 EVAP codes, now if I can just get this thing running long enough to clear the related DTCs.

Some added information I forgot to mention in OP.. I have a solid red lightning bolt on the dash, but no related DTCs. Could I have a bad throttle body causing the no-start, but no codes saying such?

Also, could anyone shed some light on why I have a p0197 (Engine oil temperature sensor circuit low) & a p0198 (Engine oil temperature sensor circuit high) codes at the same time?

Remaining codes are EVAP related- p0440, p0441, p0456, p0457. oil temp sensor codes p0197/p0198, IAT sensor circuit high p0113 & p0013 cam positiion actuator circuit open
 

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That red lightning bolt in the venturi is an electronic throttle body (ETC) fault. The fault code 'should' be stored, but I suspect that some generic OBD2 scan tool have difficulty reading them.
Common ETC fault issues are failing battery and loose ETC base mounting fasteners.

As far as not starting, I think that the ETC just controls the air into the engine. As long as you still have spark & fuel, it should fire. BTW, your description of cranking compression sounds like it is OK. I hope that there is no lasting damage from the overheat event.

P0197 and its possible causes are in post #3. P0198 (voltage high) may have been set if the connector was unplugged (to test voltage?) with the key on. Still, it shouldn't have set P0197 unless the Vt/Br wire was grounded somehow.

That melted connector bothers me. There shouldn't be current present or engine overheating from low coolant at that spot high enough to melt plastic.

The following are possible ETC fault codes. Do you know someone who might let you borrow a different scan tool to try?:
  • P0121-THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR 1 PERFORMANCE
  • P0122-THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR 1 CIRCUIT LOW
  • P0123-THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR 1 CIRCUIT HIGH
  • P0221THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR 2 CIRCUIT PERFORMANCE
  • P0222-THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR 2 CIRCUIT LOW
  • P0223-THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR 2 CIRCUIT HIGH
  • P060B-ETC A/D GROUND PERFORMANCE
  • P060D-ETC LEVEL 2 APP PERFORMANCE
  • P060E-ETC LEVEL 2 TPS PERFORMANCE
  • P060F-ETC LEVEL 2 ECT PERFORMANCE
  • P062C-ETC LEVEL 2 MPH PERFORMANCE
  • P2072-ELECTRONIC THROTTLE CONTROL SYSTEM - ICE BLOCKAGE
  • P2100-ELECTRONIC THROTTLE CONTROL MOTOR CIRCUIT
  • P2101-ELECTRONIC THROTTLE CONTROL MOTOR PERFORMANCE
  • P2107-ELECTRONIC THROTTLE CONTROL MODULE PROCESSOR
  • P2110-ELECTRONIC THROTTLE CONTROL - FORCED LIMITED RPM
  • P2111-ELECTRONIC THROTTLE CONTROL - UNABLE TO CLOSE
  • P2112-ELECTRONIC THROTTLE CONTROL - UNABLE TO OPEN
P0198:

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i also have a 2013 200 touring 2.4l the engine keeps stalling on me. it has not overheated. drives great then cuts out. it had a bad fuel pump and alternator..both have been replaced. i replaced the ecu 2 days ago and it is still stalling. after reading the responses i will check the wiring

any other suggestions? please and thank you
 

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Welcome to the forum. Questions. Stalling out at an idle or coming up to a stop? Or while driving along at highway speeds? Either when engine is cold or warm? Oil level & condition OK?
Any fault codes? Any dash warning lights, like the red ETC?
Any trouble starting while parked or restarting it after a stall?
Any warning when it is about to stall, like rough or slow idle?

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
So it turns out there was low compression in every cylinder after testing last night. Results are:
Dry. Wet
Cylinder 1: 90psi. 120psi.
Cylinder 2. 30psi. 60psi
Cylinder 3. 30psi. 60psi
Cylinder 4. 30psi. 60psi
(All results were close enough to round up to the nearest multiple of 10)
From what I've read only Cylinder number one was even close to minimum operating range. I'm hoping the timing chain has skipped, I hear no signs of a broken chain slapping around. I'm going to take a direct look at it here shortly and will be back with an update.
On a side note.. here is what I meant when I said the cam sensors were melted, not the electrical connector, but the sensors themselves(pics attached) The wiring appears to be OK, seeing as the p0340 was alleviated by new sensors.
BTW I appreciate the both of you, for leading me in the right direction with the compression test.. Much thanks!
 

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That engine must have gotten VERY hot to cause such poor compression... Looks like head gaskets/ valves /and rings are gone... The head and block probably are warped...
Engines in cars made in the late 1990s to date can not handle overheating... If the gauges show HOT shut the engine down NOW ... Not after trying to get to the next exit or trying to get home...
Time to look for another engine...
Dave
 

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Ouch! Maybe the head did get hot enough to melt plastic from the overheat!
I suspect the head gasket, possibly a warped head. Have the head checked for flatness while it is off, if diagnosis takes you there. You may want a second (live) opinion on the diagnosis.
I somehow think a slipped chain would affect all the cylinders. The block and pistons may be OK. The aluminum head would have taken the fall in a severe overheat event.
Remanufactured heads seem reasonable for these. You would also want an upper engine gasket set. The labor charge may be high. You'd turn in your old head for a core deposit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
We had just purchased the car & were aware of an issue with the EVAP system/heater core, which we intended to fix. The day it overheated on us we pulled right over & killed it on the shoulder of the road. Waited 40 minutes or so before finishing the 15 mile jaunt back to the house. I honestly think it had overheated on the previous owner & potentially had the damage done over some time. What's weird is the day before this we bought the car, when we pulled up to look at it it was already running, just sitting there idling with no issue at all.. we proceeded to drive it for over an hour after that with no issue aside from some thick vapor from the vents(which I assumed heater core) & we got it at an excellent rate so I figured doing some minor repairs we would actually come out on the deal. Then it did extremely well on the ride home which is over an hour at 60mph plus.. It's obvious now we just paid for his problems, honestly kicking myself in the.. currently smh.
 

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I would get the car evaluated by a trusted shop and a competent technician and go from there.
An overheat may have also blown out the heater core? You had no way of knowing this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well, TY for the re-assurance. I've been further investigating things this evening, as well as looking into having the vehicle towed to a reputable mechanic. As I was removing the coolant reservoir, to have a better angle at the drive belt I stumbled upon this disconnected engine ground. Any clue where this should be attached & what it might effect in its current condition? Maybe this explains my odd electrical issues??
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Circled on the left is the frayed end, as I found it & the arrow is pointing to the other end of the ground where it connects. This is passenger side, just below the coolant reservoir.
 
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