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Discussion Starter #1
My 2016 200 Limited has been making a loud noise seemingly from the rear whenever I hit a larger bump. I'm thinking maybe the car hitting the bump stop like the shock is bad. I haven't noticed any wetness on either shock. Car doesn't overly bounce when I push up and down on the rear. Before I go ahead and replace the rear shocks is there anything else i should be looking at? Any one experience that kind of noise? Car has about 78K miles.
 

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2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
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I had to replace the rear sway bar links in my 2016. They were under the 3/36 warranty. The shocks and control arm joints were fine.
Definitely diagnose the noise source before just throwing shocks at it. It could be from a number of things, either loose or worn.
 

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2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
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It was a rattle or clatter over bumps. Not a heavy sound like thumping or clunking.
 

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My 2016 200 Limited has been making a loud noise seemingly from the rear whenever I hit a larger bump. I'm thinking maybe the car hitting the bump stop like the shock is bad. I haven't noticed any wetness on either shock. Car doesn't overly bounce when I push up and down on the rear. Before I go ahead and replace the rear shocks is there anything else i should be looking at? Any one experience that kind of noise? Car has about 78K miles.
I had this problem for years. Previous posts here if you search. In summary dealer replaced every component in the shock assembly before correcting it the first time. What finally did the trick was replacing the bump stops.

But it came back, most noticeably in cold weather. What I deduced, and have pretty much confirmed now, is that when the road surface is smooth the bump stop gradually rides down on the shaft, where after a time it can stick if there is inadequate lubrication. Then when you hit a big bump, and the shock needs to travel up it meets resistance from the stuck bumper, which then releases suddenly and shoots up the shaft slamming into the shock mount, making the loud knock.

The shaft and bump stop are supposed to be lubricated with Mopar zipper lube. (Actually is lube for zippers, like for Jeep Wrangler removable plastic windows.) I lubed the shafts on mine last year with a combination of Tri-Flow spray lube, and Super Lube synthetic grease, and I have not had a single incident of the knock.

So my theory is that the necessary lubricant is not always applied at the factory as it should be, which might explain why this problem seems to be relatively rare.

BTW In the early diagnosis of this noise by the dealer they also replaced the sway bar links, but that apparently was not the source of the noise in my case, even though worn sway bar link bushings can also make a similar noise in my experience.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So should I start by just taking the shocks off, removing the bump stop, and then lubricating the shaft?
 

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2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
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Diagnose first. Locate the noise source. Can you get the noise by jouncing the rear end? Open the trunk and have a helper sit on the back bumper to bounce the car while you look underneath for the noise. Sometimes you can confirm the source by placing your hand on the part to 'feel' the noise.
Grasp the cool exhaust pipe and move it around to be sure it is not interfering with an adjacent component.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I can not replicate the noise by pushing up and down on the back end. Exhaust appears to be secure. It's definitely coming from the back.....sounds pretty much the same as a bad ball joint.
 

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So should I start by just taking the shocks off, removing the bump stop, and then lubricating the shaft?
That's one way but you need a special tool to remove the shock from the upper mount.

See this service bulletin which illustrates how to remove and replace the shock. You want to look at the UF section. The bump-stop is the colored ring at the top of the splash shield.

However, I was able to lubricate the shaft without removing the shock.

  • Jack up the car from the rear jack points in front of the rear wheels, so that the tire is off the ground and the shock fully extended.
  • Remove the tire / wheel assembly.
  • Pull down the splash shield/bump-stop assembly as far as you can, exposing most of the shock shaft.
  • Lubricate the shaft with light weight synthetic grease, like Super Lube.
  • Since part of the shaft is still hidden within the bump-stop/dust shield I also sprayed some Tri-Flow lube around the shaft at the bump stop to allow it to penetrate down to the remaining part of the shaft.
  • Move the splash shield / bump stop sub-assembly up and down to distribute the lubricant.
  • Replace wheel and tire.
  • Lower vehicle.
 

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Diagnose first. Locate the noise source. Can you get the noise by jouncing the rear end? Open the trunk and have a helper sit on the back bumper to bounce the car while you look underneath for the noise. Sometimes you can confirm the source by placing your hand on the part to 'feel' the noise.
That's normally good advice, but in my case, because of the intermittent nature of the noise, it was not applicable. I went to every extent possible to help the dealer service department duplicate the noise, (detailed in another post here) but it simply wouldn't happen consistently. Even though this noise was very loud and startling it would only occur intermittently.

Sometimes you have to examine how things work and theorize how they may go wrong, then experiment accordingly.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
That's one way but you need a special tool to remove the shock from the upper mount.
I have watched a couple YouTube videos where they just remove the two bolts holding the shock mount in place, remove the lower bolt, and pull the who;e shock out. They using a vice or vice grips they hold the extended shaft and remove the nut from the top of the shock.
 

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I have watched a couple YouTube videos where they just remove the two bolts holding the shock mount in place, remove the lower bolt, and pull the who;e shock out. They using a vice or vice grips they hold the extended shaft and remove the nut from the top of the shock.
OK. There's usually a work-around. :cool:

I've done something like that on a different vehicle removing traditional style shocks for replacement, where the small counter-hold at the top of the shaft didn't provide enough leverage to hold against the torque required to remove the mount nut.

A potential drawback, if reusing the shock, is that the vice grips will likely mar the shaft. Don't know that would cause a problem, but it might if it's severe enough to cause the splash shield and bump stop to stick. Also it would be considerably more time consuming than lubing them in place the way did which has worked so far.
 
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