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Hello, I have paid my car off and it has just under 70K miles on it. I had to put a new OEM 3.6 Pentastar motor in it since the radiator hose fell off while driving on the highway. Now that it's up and running like a brand new car.. can anyone tell me if they think my car will drive the next 20K without an issue? Like do you think the transmission will hold out till 90K and anything else major or even minor that has happened to your 200C? I'd like to keep the car and perhaps trade it off around 90K which is 2 years away for me. Lets the chip shortage, and cars on lots hopefully come back by then. I see where some of you have this 3.6 Pentastar engine and have well over 120K without ANY problems, which is amazing! I did also have to replace the tubes on both sides of the sunroof to keep it from leaking in the car when it rained. Other than that and the engine over heating it's been an amazing car for almost 70K miles.. It's Silver with the black leather interior and C trim.. so it's fully loaded. It's quiet, smooth and impressive compared to most things I've test drove. I hope to keep it with no payments for a few years. CarMax offered me 13K for it as is. Not ready to go back to car payments if I don't have to... Thoughts, anyone??
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2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
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A coolant hose failure is one of those unexpected mishaps that can cause a sudden emergency. Not only is it inconvenient, but potentially dangerous as you can't choose when or where it will happen.
Once you see the temperature climb and realize that you are over-heating, it is best to park the car and call for help.
The new rubber belts & hoses are long-lived. The hard plastic becomes brittle with age & hot/cold cycles. It may look fine from the outside and give no warning before fracturing.
From 2013 on, Chrysler recommends an OAT-type coolant meeting MS (material standard) -12106 and distilled (or very soft) water. The universal coolants are OK as long as they meet the MS. No additives should be necessary.

The best method and one that is within your control, is good maintenance. Good engine oil isn't always the best oil to use. Chrysler recommends a motor oil that meets their MS-6395. Read the label on the bottle.
I use Mopar oil filters as they aren't expensive in ebay multi-packs. I change my own oil.

As for drivetrain, there really is no scheduled maintenance interval. I don't believe in 'forever' oils and for peace of mind, a 60K interval brings peace. Even if the new lubes are synthetic and perform much better than the lubes of years ago.
The 9-speed is a drain & fill. If the outside case is bone-dry, add back in what comes out. The filter is only changed if the transaxle comes out. Use the recommended ZF/Mopar 8&9 speed Lifeguard fluid.
For AWD vehicles the PTU & rear axle fluids can be changed at 60K as well. I think that the rear diff has to be dropped down to fill.

Harsh or slipping shifts can shorten transaxle life (wear & tear). You want to make sure that you have the latest & greatest module software updates for longevity. PCM, TCM, HVAC and radio updates shown below.
This is a non-invasive service. The car can be plugged into the tool and the updates all done together at the same visit.
There is no real reason that this car can't last you a long time & be a pleasure to own & drive.

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Well, my 3.6 is going to be 8 years old in a few months, with only 45k miles, and this is what I have experienced: 3 oil filter housing failures, upper radiator hose failure (plastic connector to thermostat tube cracked), front passenger strut leaking grease, exhaust flex pipe cracked in half. Luckily I was able to fix these myself and saved hundreds of dollars. Still haven't touched the strut though, not sure if I want to tackle that in my driveway.
 

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I've replaced the struts on my 200 and it's definitely more work than on some other cars. In order to get the strut out I had to remove the entire knuckle from the car due to the way the strut attaches to it. Because of rust it took a while to get everything separated, some parts I had to spray in Liquid Wrench and then give it some time before I could get them to loosen. I'm very glad I have a garage since it took long enough to finish the job I ended up having to leave the car on jackstands overnight and pick it up the next day. It is doable but it might be worth seeing how much a shop would charge since they'll likely do it faster.

I also had a bad front wheel bearing so replacing it at the same time saved me some work though, especially since it was a lot easier to get the old hub to come loose and to bolt down the new one with the knuckle out of the wheel well.
 
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