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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone tell me where the adaptive cruise control module is located?

Apparently mine has failed. Getting FCW/ACC Service warning at startup, and warning light for same while running.

This had happened intermittently since 2017, but always corrected at next restart, so I wrote it off as moisture on the sensors, but this time it is not self-correcting and odometer is also flashing, indicating proxy alignment issue. And when I check with AlfaOBD, connection fails to the ACC module.

Would like to check whether there is just a loose or dirty connector before taking it to the dealer :cautious:, so any help would be appreciated!
 

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2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
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ADAPTIVE SPEED CONTROL
Quick Overview:

  • Utilizes Radar and camera sensors to identify vehicles in forward path and maintains a selectable distance between the vehicle and the one in front of it;
  • ACC with stop and go has full functionality between 0 and 100 mph;
  • After ACC with stop and go brings the vehicle to a stop, the driver must indicate the intention to resume by either pressing the resume button or tapping the accelerator pedal;
  • Driver can select one of four following distances depending on driver preference.
Functional Overview - The optional ACC Plus (ACC +) system (also known as ACC Stop and Go) has functionality beyond that of Normal Cruise Control and Adaptive Cruise Control. This system has the functionality of the cruise control system of maintaining a driver defined Set Speed without the driver needing to press the throttle. This system also has the functionality of the regular ACC system of increasing and decreasing the vehicle speed based on target vehicles moving slower than the ACC Set Speed. Beyond the functionality of the regular ACC system, this system offers a larger operational speed range, which constitutes of speeds from 0 mph to a configurable upper bound. If a target vehicle comes to a standstill, the ACC+ system will also bring the ACC+ host vehicle to a stop, and will keep the vehicle at a standstill for an undetermined period of time by first applying the brakes, and after the brakes time-out, cancelling the ACC+ system and applying the Electronic Park Brake (EPB). The ACC with stop and go system will also incorporate Forward Collision Warning-Plus (FCW). With grade braking, the transmission will automatically downshift to maintain selected vehicle speed and distance, preventing overheating of brakes.
The ACC sensor, the FFC, the ABM, the IC, the EVIC, the PCM and the SCCM each contain a microcontroller and programming that allow them to communicate with each other using the Controller Area Network (CAN) data bus. This method of communication is used by the ACC module to provide inputs to the ABS module, the EVIC and the PCM. This is also is used by the ABS module to provide inputs to the PCM, by the SCCM to relay the status of the speed control switches to the PCM and by the PCM for control of the indicators in the IC and the indications in the EVIC. (Refer to 08 - Electrical/8E - Electronic Control Modules/COMMUNICATION - Description) .
The ACC with stop and go system used also incorporates grade braking and Forward Collision Warning-Plus (FCW). With grade braking, the transmission will automatically downshift to maintain selected vehicle speed and distance, preventing overheating of brakes.
The optional equipment ACC+ system includes the following major components, which are described in further detail elsewhere in this service information:

Hard wired circuitry connects the adaptive electronic speed control system components to the electrical system of the vehicle. These hard wired circuits are integral to several wire harnesses, which are routed throughout the vehicle and retained by many different methods. These circuits may be connected to each other, to the vehicle electrical system and to the speed control system components through the use of a combination of soldered splices, splice block connectors, and many different types of wire harness terminal connectors and insulators. Refer to the appropriate wiring information. The wiring information includes wiring diagrams, proper wire and connector repair procedures, further details on wire harness routing and retention, as well as pin-out and location views for the various wire harness connectors, splices and grounds.


The ACC module:

DESCRIPTION




NOTE:​
The Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) module lens could be obstructed by snow/ice, dirt, mud, or other elements. A message will appear on the dash to clean the radar. The Radar is equipped with a heating element that can melt snow/ice. Otherwise, the radar must be cleaned manually.​

The ACC module is a stand-alone forward facing radar module. It is mounted to the vehicle structure, outside the cabin, in a manner allowing for an unobstructed view. The ACC module can operate as a stand-alone Electronic Control Unit (ECU) or can also be used in conjunction with additional forward ranging and object detection sensors in order to provide many driver assistance systems features.
The ACC module is located on a bracket secured on the passenger right underside of the front bumper support behind the front fascia. The stamped steel ACC module mounting bracket is secured by two screws to a bracket on the bumper support member. The ACC Module consists of a radar sensor, a sensor-integrated ECU with CAN interface, and software for radar measurement, object tracking and longitudinal control.
The ACC module and radar sensor communicates with other vehicle ECUs via both public and private bus networks to provide the following features sets:

  • Standard Cruise Control
  • Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)
  • Enhanced Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC+)
  • Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop and Go (ACC+)
  • Forward Collision Warning (FCW)
  • FCW with Collision Mitigation (FCW+)
  • Full Speed Range Forward Collision Mitigation (FSRFCW+)
  • Advanced Brake Assist (ABA)
One fixed ball stud (4) and two adjustable ball studs (3) secure the module housing through a snap fit into three molded plastic ball socket clips installed in the mounting bracket. The module pivots on the fixed ball stud while the two adjustable ball studs allow the module to be vertically aligned after installation using an ACC vertical alignment special tool and a 3.5 millimeter hex nut driver special tool. Horizontal alignment is performed electronically using a diagnostic scan tool during a ten minute drive at a steady, predetermined speed following completion of the vertical alignment. Any necessary adjustments indicated as a result of the drive will need to be completed.
The ACC module electronic circuitry is sealed and protected within a die cast aluminum housing. A molded plastic cover and a lens or radar dome (5) faces forward through an opening in the center of the front fascia lower airflow grille texture that is trimmed with a bezel snapped into the texture opening. A molded plastic module bezel or mirror cover with a center clearance hole for the module lens snaps over the module and conceals a small square mirror in one corner of the module cover that is used for calibration purposes during the module manufacturing process.
The ACC module includes an applied connector receptacle (2) that is sealed and secured to the module housing with screws and faces downward when installed on the mounting bracket. The ACC module is connected to the vehicle electrical system through a single dedicated takeout and connector of the Front End Module (FEM) wire harness.
The adjustable ball studs and the ACC module cannot be repaired. If ineffective or damaged the entire module unit must be replaced. The three plastic ball socket clips in the module mounting bracket must also be replaced each time the ACC module is removed from and reinstalled onto the mounting bracket.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. I took a look at the module and made sure the connector was seated. Then disconnected the battery for 10 minutes and reconnected to see if perhaps the module's ECU would reboot. Unfortunately it would still not connect via AlfaOBD. Based on the intermittent issue over time, I suspect there may be a bad solder joint somewhere in the module. Regardless, it is now off to the dealer.

The ACC module for the 2015 model year is shockingly expensive and I am out of warranty, so will have to see how this turns out. :cautious: (I could have purchased a used one, but there is no guarantee that's the answer and a dealer alignment procedure is required after re-installation, so I decided to bite the bullet and have them do the whole job.)
 

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2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
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I have reflowed cold, cracked solder joints in things like instrument clusters and radios to repair them. A mechanical shock like a fist thump on top of the dash may get them working, albeit temporarily.
If a cover removes easily enough, it may be worth a look inside. Being up front and out in the open, it gets blasted with rain, salt and snow if you are in an area that gets Winter weather.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just got the car back from the dealer today, after two weeks.

The connector from the harness to the ACC module was severely corroded. No obvious reason why, as the connector was fully seated when I checked it. However, it was so badly corroded internally that the tech had trouble removing it.

The job could have been completed five days sooner, however the tech wanted to replace the module along with the harness without first checking whether the module might still work with a new harness and cleaned connection. The list price for the module part is $1,560 on top of $291 for the harness. I wasn't about to pay that much for a new module without proof the old one was bad, so I asked the service manager to first try with only a new harness. Unfortunately even with a new harness the tech still could not get the old module to connect, so it took more time to get a new module shipped.

I asked the service manager to contact FCA and see if they would extend warranty coverage in view of mile car's extremely low miles, careful maintenance, and the fact the connector obviously allowed moisture intrusion, which certainly points to a defect. In the past I've had good responses with the "old" Chrysler and Daimler Chrysler corporations being willing to extend warranty coverage with low mileage on a vehicle in situations where non-"wear" parts failed. Those companies understood that this sort issue is how a company loses a customer. Sadly the answer from the service manager's FCA contact was "NO".

The service manager was more understanding though (He at least wanted to have a less unhappy customer to hopefully have business with in the future.) and did work with me on discounting the parts and labor. (Book price for the labor was $845 for diagnosis, remove, replace and realignment.) Still, even with discounts the job was over two grand. It would have been considerably more if I hadn't asked for help and he hadn't agreed to work with me.

For reference, if my memory is correct, the list price of the Safety Tec package was $1,100 originally. So, it's easy to see why I would have appreciated help from FCA.
 
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2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
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Maybe a good idea for owners with this ACC option to preemptively pack the connector with dielectric grease in order to prevent water intrusion.
Any connectors inside wheel wells or behind grilles are susceptible to road splash/weather-related corrosion.
Dielectric grease may also help AGS (active grille shutter) module terminals to resist corrosion.
Sorry it happened to such a young car, but I'm glad that the service manager at least met you part of the way on the bill.
 
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