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I made an oil catch can for the breather side of the engine. Here is a video showing how I made it, you can make the same one for around $29 (if you have glue) from Lowes. I opted not to use a sight glass because I empty my catch cans at every oil change. It usually has 1-2 oz of oil in it, so nothing to worry about.

 

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Hey Pitt, for myself, and probably a few more others, can you explain the upside of doing this? Does it affect performance or is it just a "maintenance" kinda thing?
 

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Hey Pitt, for myself, and probably a few more others, can you explain the upside of doing this? Does it affect performance or is it just a "maintenance" kinda thing?
Oil is being pulled from the PCV and Breather port on a 3.6L and getting all over the inside of your intake, this can effect performance but not enough to notice. It gets all over your valves and Tbody Blades. Everyone with a 3.6 has this issue.
 

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Oil shouldn't be pulled into the breather port. That's fresh air from the breather port that should be sucked in to the motor then circulated out through the the pcv system. Why not just put a small filter on that line and cap off that port on the intake?
 

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If you drive with "gusto" you could need this but if you drive in a conservative manner, then you don't. You find this problem with supercharged engines and turbos. If you are a conservative driver, then a few ozs. of Marvel Mystery Oil (MMO) will keep deposits off of your valves-just follow mfg's directions for use.
 

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Oil shouldn't be pulled into the breather port. That's fresh air from the breather port that should be sucked in to the motor then circulated out through the the pcv system. Why not just put a small filter on that line and cap off that port on the intake?
Under heavy acceleration the oil "mist" from inside the valve cover travels through the breather tube into your air intake. Putting a breather on the end of it will not generate positive crankcase ventilation and can cause your pistons to have blow by, and it helps create a better seal on the piston rings. A lot of race cars have a sump pump that creates a vacuum and helps the seals on the piston rings.
 

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pcv_flow.jpg
Just to be clear you put the second catch can inline where the blue lines of travel are in this picture correct? The pcv system uses vacuum from the intake manifold which creates high vacuum under load on the pcv valve side. I'm trying to understand how oil could travel back up the fresh air tube from the valve cover port.
 

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That is not how our system works. That's old school systems. Today's vehicles need to burn up as much "EPA" gases as possible. The system on our cars pulls vacuum via the intake at your air filter (pulls air from your valve cover which contains oil mist), your air filter intake tube is constantly pulling vacuum. The PCV is connected via a tube directly to your intake manifold and again pulling constant vacuum (oil mist in the air gets sucked straight into your intake)
 

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PITT, the reason I'm questioning this is because of an issue I had with our other car. My 2013 Chevy Impala with the 3.6L motor was getting small amounts of oil accumulating in the intake tract tubing. The issue was completly resolved with a redesigned pcv valve from Chevy with slightly larger orifices in the pcv valve. The larger orifices allowed slightly more vacuum to be drawn by the pcv valve which stops air and oil from backing up in to the fresh air tube connected to the air filter intake. This was a well documented issue on the Impala forums I read and has now been resolved with the new design pcv valve. Non of that may apply to the 3.6L Pentastar motor but the issue does seem similar.
 

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This is an issue with virtually every vehicle. Some vehicles intake box/housing is typically designed to block off oil consumption through the intake. The stock intake housing has this feature built in, you will notice the PCV hose has a designated section within the intake housing to block any flow of oil through the hose. You will run into this issue when you upgrade to a CAI setup which the pcv hose connects to the intake tube rather than a housing (where the fiter is located). Virtually every vehicle i've owned if you pull the pcv hose off and put your finger inside of it (Where it connects to the intake side) you will notice oil and should also visibly see it inside of the intake as well.
 

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This is an issue with virtually every vehicle. Some vehicles intake box/housing is typically designed to block off oil consumption through the intake. The stock intake housing has this feature built in, you will notice the PCV hose has a designated section within the intake housing to block any flow of oil through the hose. You will run into this issue when you upgrade to a CAI setup which the pcv hose connects to the intake tube rather than a housing (where the fiter is located). Virtually every vehicle i've owned if you pull the pcv hose off and put your finger inside of it (Where it connects to the intake side) you will notice oil and should also visibly see it inside of the intake as well.
Pitt and 200-s have a good explication for the 3.6 system. The stock intake filter have a pretty good design setup for catch the oil from the intake. The oil pass the oem air filter before return to the intake. But if you install a cai ( i buy pitt cai kit) you must install a catch can before the intake connection, because oem catch oil system is removed. So in ideal world you have two catch can, in the breather line and in the pcv line.
 

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So i need to install two catch can $$$$. My guest is, hi make the one pitt DIY or buy a cheap ebay one (d1 spec?) and put the same pitt system inside( ss whole )?
 

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Pitt and 200-s have a good explication for the 3.6 system. The stock intake filter have a pretty good design setup for catch the oil from the intake. The oil pass the oem air filter before return to the intake. But if you install a cai ( i buy pitt cai kit) you must install a catch can before the intake connection, because oem catch oil system is removed. So in ideal world you have two catch can, in the breather line and in the pcv line.
Check this image for more info
View attachment 34466
 

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The "OEM catch can" is mostly worthless - nothing more than a splatter shield it DOES NOT pass through the filter before the intake - but better than most OEM designs I suppose.

Oil all over my IAT with the stock setup.

See pic of the stock airbox with the shield where the PCV hose connects. Oil still gets past it.

IMG_0141.jpg
 

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The "OEM catch can" is mostly worthless - nothing more than a splatter shield it DOES NOT pass through the filter before the intake - but better than most OEM designs I suppose.

Oil all over my IAT with the stock setup.

See pic of the stock airbox with the shield where the PCV hose connects. Oil still gets past it.

View attachment 34578

Yes but the splatter shield is directly sealed at the filter element so the oil drop in the filter element before returning in the intake with the fresh air. Check your filter at the buttom of splatter and you see the oil in the filter.
 
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