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Hello,
Any thoughts on E88 for the 200 v6? I have been using it for a few months now on my flex fuel v6 and see no difference between that and the normal 87 except about 10 cents per gal cheaper. Is it bad for my engine? Should I stop using it?
 

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E85 IS NOT bad for your engine, it's far cleaner than gasoline, in fact if you have used only gasoline for say 75K miles etc.., it's recommended to run 50/50 mix at first cause of the deposits left by gasoline are cleaned up by the ethanol and could clog the fuel injectors if you run 100% E85.

Performance - on the Facebook page for 200's dyno proven 25ft.lbs of torque more to the wheels with E85 vs E10 87 octane.

Economy - that all depends on the price spread between E85 and whatever grade of gasoline you use. If the price is identical, gasoline will save you money. 20-30% worse fuel economy on E85.

The 2015+ 200 V6 AWD is 16MPG mixed city/highway on E85 and 22MPG mixed city/highway gasoline according to EPA.

I use E85 for the most of the time it's far less expensive than gasoline here and I like the performance - that and I can say to all the Prius tree hugging hippies that my car is more friendly to the environment than theirs because I get about 75+MPG - of gasoline, and alcohol (ethanol) exhaust is carbon dioxide and water vapor not carbon monoxide. The only thing I don't like is having to fill up more often, even before I started using it I thought the tank was small on the 200.

If the temp outside gets below say 0 degrees Fahrenheit I use gasoline because the colder it is, the harder it is to ignite ethanol. Owners manual recommends to not use it below a certain temp - not sure what that is but things are different here at 5280 feet above sea level, so it may be a warmer temp than 0 Fahrenheit.

Here's a good calculator to use to see what is more economical to run if that is what you are looking for:

http://toflexornottoflex.com/#/
 
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No one has been able to tell me yet if my v6 200 with a black gas cap can safely run e85. If not, why not, and what parts are different than a yellow gas cap car?
 

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No one has been able to tell me yet if my v6 200 with a black gas cap can safely run e85. If not, why not, and what parts are different than a yellow gas cap car?

Honestly, I'd be shocked if the cap was the only fuel system part difference with the programming for E85 being the biggest difference, if they even make that change at all. Would be interesting to poke into either computer system and compare what the differences are.
 

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Honestly, I'd be shocked if the cap was the only fuel system part difference with the programming for E85 being the biggest difference, if they even make that change at all. Would be interesting to poke into either computer system and compare what the differences are.
Likely just that. But...that is still a bad, bad thing. Certain rubbers are affected by the ethonal. But that is mainly it. If the car isn't tuned for e85… the logic wouldn't overfuel enough to get the proper ethonal a/f ratio. So the car can lean out, burn pistons. I have tested my non-e85 focus and found all is well up until about e-17 to e-20. If you don't have a yellow gas cap I'd recommend not putting more then a calculated 15-17% ethonal in it. You will feel a slight difference with that. Should at least.
 

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Auto oems don't pay for anything if they don't have too. The cheaper the better. So mechanically I'm willing to bet there's no difference other then possibly a sensor in the fuel pump mechanism. But I tried digging through wire diagrams and etc, it appears there's not an ethonal sensor like GM uses. It has logic that sees the change in A/f ratio from the O2 sensors, then adjusts per whatever logic. But it baffles me that they can give a percentage of ethonal based upon these calculations. Shows me the spent a lot of time and money to test and run not using a sensor.
 

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Likely just that. But...that is still a bad, bad thing. Certain rubbers are affected by the ethonal. But that is mainly it. If the car isn't tuned for e85… the logic wouldn't overfuel enough to get the proper ethonal a/f ratio. So the car can lean out, burn pistons. I have tested my non-e85 focus and found all is well up until about e-17 to e-20. If you don't have a yellow gas cap I'd recommend not putting more then a calculated 15-17% ethonal in it. You will feel a slight difference with that. Should at least.
I think it depends on the different models too, I know there are some that do not tolerate it well, then hears stories of Volts, Hyundai, and other brands that can handle 40% or higher without plating with the programming any, then only needing to change that if they are going to E85 as it seems like a lot of the modern rubbers and plastics for the US Domestic Market that are made to be compatable with 10-15% will handle higher blends without much of an issue component wise. Typically the biggest difference outside of programming will be fuel system components that can flow enough to keep up with the increased flow demand required for the alcohol, and I have heard that the 3.6l's injectors are a little under sized for all out N/A power under severe flow demands, but they typically are sold as grocery getter engines, not the hot rod engines that they seem more than capable of being on just 87, let alone E85.
 

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Honestly, I'd be shocked if the cap was the only fuel system part difference with the programming for E85 being the biggest difference, if they even make that change at all. Would be interesting to poke into either computer system and compare what the differences are.
The funny part is that every time I input the vin on various auto part store sites and car insurance sites it shows up as 3.6 VVT FFV. It's so confusing. My wife's '12 caravan with the 3.6 has a yellow gas cap and runs great on e85.
 

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The funny part is that every time I input the vin on various auto part store sites and car insurance sites it shows up as 3.6 VVT FFV. It's so confusing. My wife's '12 caravan with the 3.6 has a yellow gas cap and runs great on e85.
I'd love to know why some of the late model 3.6l 200s are flex and some aren't, that's why I think itnwould be interesting to get them on a HP Tuners like program to compare the timing in the fuel, ignition, and VVTi systems from a black cap vs yellow cap car. That said, right now I'm pushing 70k in my '12 with the 3.6l and almost all of that is on E85 as well and the tailpipes are amazingly clean when compared to anything that burns gasoline, so much so.you.can still see the welds from where the steel sheet the tailpipes were made from was rolled into a tube and welded!
 

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Ugh, low emission fuels are not touching my **** car.

Never have never will...

Performances are maxed with midgrade on the V6
(safty standards)

200s maybe a grocery getter but not putting that "save the atmosphere" crud in my car.
?
 

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In reality, 87 works perfectly fine in the 3.6l and while 89 would be an improvement, 93 and especially E85 is where you will see a,real improvement in power. Even on the factory tunes, the 3.6l takes on a different, more agressive attitude on E85 from idle to redline and when you mix it with the cool, Midwestern night air, they turn the Avengers and 200's into little street bruisers that will spin their tires (unless it's a UF w/AWD) and torque steer like their turbocharged 4cyl predecessors did as they unleashed their own, special form of ****.
 

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E85 IS NOT bad for your engine, it's far cleaner than gasoline, in fact if you have used only gasoline for say 75K miles etc.., it's recommended to run 50/50 mix at first cause of the deposits left by gasoline are cleaned up by the ethanol and could clog the fuel injectors if you run 100% E85.

Performance - on the Facebook page for 200's dyno proven 25ft.lbs of torque more to the wheels with E85 vs E10 87 octane.

Economy - that all depends on the price spread between E85 and whatever grade of gasoline you use. If the price is identical, gasoline will save you money. 20-30% worse fuel economy on E85.

The 2015+ 200 V6 AWD is 16MPG mixed city/highway on E85 and 22MPG mixed city/highway gasoline according to EPA.

I use E85 for the most of the time it's far less expensive than gasoline here and I like the performance - that and I can say to all the Prius tree hugging hippies that my car is more friendly to the environment than theirs because I get about 75+MPG - of gasoline, and alcohol (ethanol) exhaust is carbon dioxide and water vapor not carbon monoxide. The only thing I don't like is having to fill up more often, even before I started using it I thought the tank was small on the 200.

If the temp outside gets below say 0 degrees Fahrenheit I use gasoline because the colder it is, the harder it is to ignite ethanol. Owners manual recommends to not use it below a certain temp - not sure what that is but things are different here at 5280 feet above sea level, so it may be a warmer temp than 0 Fahrenheit.

Here's a good calculator to use to see what is more economical to run if that is what you are looking for:

http://toflexornottoflex.com/#/
Hello,
Any thoughts on E88 for the 200 v6? I have been using it for a few months now on my flex fuel v6 and see no difference between that and the normal 87 except about 10 cents per gal cheaper. Is it bad for my engine? Should I stop using it?
He's asking about e88 Fuel and so am I not E85 I already know that I can use E85 I'm wondering about the e88...its a blue handled gas pump :):).tks guys
 

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He's asking about e88 Fuel and so am I not E85 I already know that I can use E85 I'm wondering about the e88...its a blue handled gas pump :):).tks guys
If you can use e85, then e88 is fine to use. It contains ( e88 ) up to 15% ethanol and can be used on newer vehicles built after 2001.
 

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Note to fltrru103, e88 is 88% ethanol and the vehicle must be flex-fuel (yellow gas cap). So if he was using e85, e88 is acceptable (aside from my views on ethanol...)
 

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It is NOT e88, it is unleaded88; big difference. It does not even follow any convention; it is a marketing lie plain and simple as the assumption would be 12% ethanol or e12. But NO it is 15% ethanol or more commonly known as E15 or in their marketing world, unleaded85.

And people wonder why I do not trust the ethanol producers when they lie about ethanol content with a marketing campaign.
 

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It is NOT e88, it is unleaded88; big difference. It does not even follow any convention; it is a marketing lie plain and simple as the assumption would be 12% ethanol or e12. But NO it is 15% ethanol or more commonly known as E15 or in their marketing world, unleaded85.

And people wonder why I do not trust the ethanol producers when they lie about ethanol content with a marketing campaign.
Marketing confusion to be sure, but it's for those who live in and around the central part of the country where ethanol gas is common.
There is no E85 around here or any flex fuel alternatives, so I am in the dark on this.
However, read this. It explains 88 or E88 fuel. It does have 88 octane and 15% ethanol.
 

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So e88 refers to 88 octane and not ethanol content?? What a confusing piece of marketing bs....
 
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