Chrysler 200 Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,624 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have to replace a front lower control arm yet? I have no idea how this happened, just started to notice some light clunking over bumps on the left side, my left front control arm bushing is pretty much gone.

Automotive tire Tire Auto part Automotive wheel system Synthetic rubber
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
Here's the procedure from the service manual (no pics unfortunately).

Raise and support the vehicle. (Refer to 04 - Vehicle Quick Reference/Hoisting - Standard Procedure)


 

Remove the wheel mounting nuts (3), then the tire and wheel assembly (1).


 

Remove the nut (4) attaching the lower ball joint to the lower control arm (5).


 

Release the lower ball joint (3) from the lower control arm (1) using Remover (2) 9360 . Do not lift the knuckle out of the lower control arm at this time.
CAUTION:
Upon removing the knuckle from the ball joint stud, do not pull outward on the knuckle. Pulling the knuckle outward at this point can separate the inner C/V joint on the half shaft thus damaging it.


 

At each end of the stabilizer bar, while holding the stabilizer bar link (1) lower stud stationary, remove the nut (3) securing the link to the stabilizer bar (2).
Rotate the ends of the stabilizer bar (2) upward away from the lower control arm.


 

Remove the front bolt (1) attaching the lower control arm (3) to the front suspension crossmember.
Remove the nut on the rear bolt (2) attaching the lower control arm (3) to the front suspension crossmember. Remove the bolt.
Remove the lower control arm (3) from the crossmember.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
I just started getting some clicking over bumps. Was thinking sway bar links or strut mounts. But I have noticed minor cracking on those rear control arm mounts. They’re cheap if you van press them out to replace them instead of the entire arm. Lure you there is little to no YouTube videos on 200 procedures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Posted about this issue last week on my 2015 V6 S. Car has just over 52K on it and the rear big bushings in both lower control arms are now coming apart. Bought the car new and was shocked to see this after I took her in for a routine rotate balance and alignment check at my local tire shop.This has to be a design problem with these cars! This one is the wife's car and has been babied was a real shocker to see this happen on this car! Have the Chrysler 7 70 extended so covered but absolutely no excuse for this to happen on this car at under 5 years and 52K!!
 

·
Administrator
2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
Joined
·
2,865 Posts
There have been a couple of Mopar part number revisions, so hopefully the newer bushings are better.
When replacing control arms, etc. it is important to leave the fasteners loose until the weight of the vehicle is on the ground at road-attitude. Then torque the fasteners to the correct values.
If the fasteners are tightened with the vehicle off the ground and the wheels hanging, this will introduce a 'twist' to the rubber bushing once the car is sitting on the ground. This can stress and eventually tear the new rubber bushing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
There have been a couple of Mopar part number revisions, so hopefully the newer bushings are better.
When replacing control arms, etc. it is important to leave the fasteners loose until the weight of the vehicle is on the ground at road-attitude. Then torque the fasteners to the correct values.
If the fasteners are tightened with the vehicle off the ground and the wheels hanging, this will introduce a 'twist' to the rubber bushing once the car is sitting on the ground. This can stress and eventually tear the new rubber bushing.
Good advice on the install of these bushings. Volvo used the same design on the lower control arm bushings with a few models and have experience with them. You are spot on here in that if you tighten these up with the weight off the suspension you will put the busing in a strain with this design and cause it to prematurely fail. Know this from direct experience with a Volvo using this design and just had to replace a set of busings a second time as a result!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Anyone have to replace a front lower control arm yet? I have no idea how this happened, just started to notice some light clunking over bumps on the left side, my left front control arm bushing is pretty much gone.

View attachment 53698
What was the mileage on yours when you found this? Mine was out on both sides at under 5 years and just over 52000 miles. Car was bought new by us in July of 2015 and has been babied not beat on rough roads or abused in any way. This was frightening to see happen at this mileage and time on this car the way it has been treated since new. Had some puzzling symptoms as of late such as abrupt clunk on a couple harsh bumps and at times then some weird abrupt jerks when decelerating and then getting back on the throttle or suddenly backing off on a hill as of late that then could not be recreated. Leads me to believe there may be a design issue or material issue with the bushings here.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,624 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
My passenger side or right side lower control arm bushing is now done as well. Car is over 100K miles, and the drivers side went out around 80K miles or so - I don't recall.

For the people here and all the non-registered web searchers/forum browsers below is a good link for DIY'ers on to replace them - a Dodge Dart is basically a small 200 2nd gen or the 200 is a big fancy Dodge Dart with an available V6 however you want to see it.

You will need to remove the front fascia support beam on the side where you replace the lower control arm - this is in order to remove the front horizontal bolt attaching the lower control arm to the front suspension cross-member. I didn't see these details in the above posted service manual instructions, I wonder if that service manual is for a first gen 200 (11-14)?

 
  • Like
Reactions: Sleeper200c

·
Registered
2016 Chrysler 200s 2.4L
Joined
·
166 Posts
I know that you will also need some "E" torx sockets...I found that out when I replaced the engine cradle and had to remove a bunch of them (My 2016 200s had a smashed front end that the damage intrusion was on the passenger side damaging the lower frame rail the aluminum crash bars and then the mounting for those bars) I found a good set of these sockets (3/8") at "Lowes" in their automotive section for around $37 and they handled the abuse with no damage... I now KNOW how the front end of the 2016 200s goes together :)
So far the car hasn't caused me too much grief...
Dave
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,624 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
I know that you will also need some "E" torx sockets...
E20 for the forward facing and bottom control arm bolt and E16 for the bottom ball joint pinch bolt... car is sitting on jacks at the moment waiting for parts. Replacing the whole control arm instead of just the bushing because the bottom of the bushing / control arm was damaged. Odd that I don't recall running over anything.
 

·
Administrator
2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
Joined
·
2,865 Posts
Welcome to the forums. Suspension parts for 17" and 18" wheels are generally the same.
19" wheels use unique lower control arms. They may fit, but they are shaped differently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
2012 w/ 140,000 on the clock. Passenger front arm, rear bushing failed inspection.
Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Tread Car


Shop wanted $410 parts and labor to replace entire arm. Drivers side passed but on last legs. I got it out in like an hour and one you tube video. Hard part was not having right tool for sway bar end links. Moog or equivalent arm w/ bushings $80ish at RA.
Automotive tire Wood Gas Automotive exterior Auto part


The blown bushing alone is like $15. I'll pay the $60 not to fight it out/in and replace the front bushing at the same time. So far, the difficulty level is lower than doing a complete strut.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Trick for putting it back in: rear bolt first, then ball joint, front bolt last. Both arms, both outer tie rod ends, hella branded bulb, $200 plus my time. Shop would have been $1100 plus. Took if for a thrash, gonna wait on the alignment because feels good so far.
Wheel Automotive tire Locking hubs Vehicle brake Motor vehicle


Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Gas Automotive wheel system


Reasonable to assume fresh bushings impacting recent alignment after struts. Didn't touch the struts and old ones not that wasted. Way old school toe gauge works well for keeping it close to where ya found it when doing the tie rod ends. The Moogs are about one full turn shorter than OE and ya can see it on the bench.

Mark the jamb nut, back it off 1 full turn. Pop end out of knuckle, count turns while removing. Count turns while replacing, line up end w/ knuckle, add / sub turn or two to line it up.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top