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There is absolutely no need to lower the 200. It is as low, if not lower than you ever want it now. Dropping it an inch will be like the Emporer's new clothes, only you will be able to see it, and you will run over even more junk on the road.
 

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There is absolutely no need to lower the 200. It is as low, if not lower than you ever want it now. Dropping it an inch will be like the Emporer's new clothes, only you will be able to see it, and you will run over even more junk on the road.
don’t be a fuddy dud
 

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I went from 215/55 tires too 225/50 and I scrape the shield occasionally and thats about 1/2" lower.
 

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here are reasons to raise or lower vehicles, and none are applicable to a 200.

The aerodynamics on these cars is very finely tuned, already, to any kind of speed you will ever do in them.

Put your money elsewhere.

Lowered 2" rear 3" front.... 580hp-502cuin big block, aluminum heads, 870cfm Holley, TH-400, Ford 9"... Fuddy duddy my...

monteslide150.JPG
 

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Nice!
 

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A lowered 200 would look great. I get it.

Sometimes people do things to their car that make it function worse for the sake of looks..

One example - gigantic wheels with spacer lift kits (to fit the school bus sized wheels) and teeny weeny stock brakes with panted calipers, or caliper covers inside. Looks stupid to me but great to other people. To each their own.

Do what makes you happy, just be prepared for the results.
 

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I know a few people have used Eibach Lowering Springs on their 2015+ 200's. It gives a 1 inch drop. I haven't looked into how it would affect the vehicles performance or handling. I just know that has been a common customization I have seen.
 

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I have never had any issues with mine and I live in Missouri with the crappiest roads in the country!
You haven't had any issues with your what? Can you elaborate?

I assume you mean you lowered your car? How low - what suspension?

I am an enthusiast too. I like to modify and like modified cars when I have time and $$.

I just don't want anyone to think there isn't an increased risk of doing damage by lowering their Chrysler 200 - but don't take my word for it:

https://www.lesschwab.com/article/lowering-suspension-pros-and-cons.html


https://www.meineke.com/blog/pros-and-cons-of-suspension-lowering/
 

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I fined the 200S is already pretty low, actually lower than I would like. There are many times when going down or up steep ramps or roads where I have to be cautious. I think lowering the car an 1" could make it very susceptible to scrapping the bottom, especially if you live in an area that gets snow in the winter.
 

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Mine has stock 200 S suspension, but I want to lower it for better handing, the 245 45 18" tires definitely negatively affected the suspension, but most wouldn't notice, I would love to do the 19" wheels with 245 40 19 "tires with Eibach springs, but that's a little down the road.
 

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Proper lowering or raising of a vehicle is more than just springs.
You are changing steering and driveaxle angles/lengths by changing ride height.
You may be able to set toe-in, but tires may still wear faster. Tracking may be adversely affected on turns causing instability. Articulated axle joints may be stressed more than usual. This is over and above any nuisance bottoming out or pavement scraping.

Proper lowering should be done with 'all' systems in mind to keep the steering/suspension/axle attitudes correct. The best way (if you must) is to go to lower profile tires.
A 1" lowering of the vehicle would be a 2" shorter tire. It may ride harder (less sidewall cushioning). The larger brakes on an S or C may not accommodate a smaller wheel size.

When performing an alignment on a vehicle with rear suspension adjustment features, adjust the rear camber first, rear toe setting next, then front toe. On the Chrysler 200 (UF body style), rear camber is adjusted by rotating the mounting bolt and nut on the lower transverse link which has a cam feature. The mounting location to the lower control arm is slotted to allow the adjustment.

The front caster and camber is set when the car is built (net-build). You can shift the front cradle around to compensate for slight + or - values.
You can't adjust for the left/right +/+ or -/- values that a ride height change would induce.

 
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