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Have a 2015 200s with 50,000 miles on it. Started having cylinder 5 misfire, replaced the spark plug and coil. Problem went away for two days then came back. At which time I replaced the fuel injector and intake seals. Again problem went away for a few days then came back as cylinder six misfire and random misfires. At this point I’m stuck on what to do. I have an extended warranty, but not able to get it into a dealer until the 9th. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.
 

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P0305, then P0300 and P0306? Please stop replacing parts and diagnose this first. You might have eliminated spark and fuel as the #5 cylinder misfire cause, possibly not if there is a PCM driver or engine compartment wiring harness problem.
Engine mechanical is also a possibility. This may not show up with a compression test (i.e. - low). A cylinder compression leakdown test may show intake or exhaust valve leakage. If a valve is burnt, it may only show up when run hot and hard. As you noted, this is can be intermittent. It may take awhile to set a misfire code. It also appears to have moved around (to the other bank?).
If the misfire can be felt as a 'shake', it might be bad enough where you don't want to drive the car any more than you have to.
Get the car to the dealer for a diagnosis. Worst case may be a bad head, but that should be covered. A rental car in the meantime may also be covered depending on terms of your extended warranty/service contract. There may or may not be a deductible applied.
 
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This could also be something as simple as a failing battery. A 2015 will have a battery that's now almost 5 years old and likely due to fail. Have a load-test performed (don't just measure no-load voltage) to see what condition it's in.
 

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I'm inclined to think you may have a possible internal engine problem with the camshaft, rocker or lifters.
Been some problems with those items causing misfires.
However, it could be anything with the fuel system or ignition.
 

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The battery is about 3 months old.
When it was replaced, were the terminals all cleaned? You can't tell by eyeballing it if there is oxidation between the clamps and post. I would still do a load test on the battery to be sure. What is the voltage at idle, with engine off, and after 10 minutes with engine off, headlights on?
 

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The OP was last logged in about 23 months ago, I did send a message and see if they will respond.
Are you experiencing a misfire also?
 

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I have a 2013 200 that has been randomly misfiring with no direct cylinder until today. Today as I came to a stop the engine started studdering and shut down. Now I have misfire on cylinder 3 and it doesn't have enough power to go. I spoke with my brother and he mentioned it could possibly be the spark plugs, coil packs, or valve cover as the oil could be getting to the plugs and causing the misfires. Hopefully I can relay back what my cause was once I get it home and work on it. Any ideas to also check while I'm at it??

Brandy :)
 

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I have a 2013 200 that has been randomly misfiring with no direct cylinder until today. Today as I came to a stop the engine started studdering and shut down. Now I have misfire on cylinder 3 and it doesn't have enough power to go. I spoke with my brother and he mentioned it could possibly be the spark plugs, coil packs, or valve cover as the oil could be getting to the plugs and causing the misfires. Hopefully I can relay back what my cause was once I get it home and work on it. Any ideas to also check while I'm at it??

Brandy :)
Welcome to the 200 forum.
It literally could be anything.
Starting point would be to check if it has any fault codes.
Changing the spark plugs won't hurt, but you still need to find the cause. Make sure you buy the correct replacement plugs if you decide to change them.
 

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Welcome to the forums. It could be a few things causing this. Let's do some diagnosis first so you're not just throwing time and money at guesses.
If you had a P0300, pay attention to that code instead of having it choose a particular cylinder to blame.

This is a 4-cylinder? There are 2 different 2.4Ls, one has a sales code of ED3, the other is an EDG. Both are the 'B' engines according to the VIN.
The differences were the ED3 has copper spark plugs (Champion RC12MC4 gapped to 0.044") and the EDG has platinum spark plugs (Champion RC12PMCB3 gapped to 0.032"). The ED3 may not run well with the platinums, especially when cold.
How many miles on these plugs? The Coppers should be changed every 32K miles (52K km) and the platinums should be changed at 102K miles (164K km). The platinums last longer, but the coppers offer a better burn.

The spark plug tips can tell a story about misfire. White tips can indicate a lean mixture. Black, dry tips can indicate a rich mixture and black, oily tips may indicate oil burning from possible engine damage(?)

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Another misfire issue can leave behind evidence of arcing to ground on both the sparkplug body and the rubber boot for the coil.
Some boots can be replaced without having to replace the entire coil.

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Not related to misfire, but there is a TSB 18-058-17 for a PCM software update:
 
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Welcome to the forums. It could be a few things causing this. Let's do some diagnosis first so you're not just throwing time and money at guesses.
If you had a P0300, pay attention to that code instead of having it choose a particular cylinder to blame.

This is a 4-cylinder? There are 2 different 2.4Ls, one has a sales code of ED3, the other is an EDG. Both are the 'B' engines according to the VIN.
The differences were the ED3 has copper spark plugs (Champion RC12MC4 gapped to 0.044") and the EDG has platinum spark plugs (Champion RC12PMCB3 gapped to 0.032"). The ED3 may not run well with the platinums, especially when cold.
How many miles on these plugs? The Coppers should be changed every 32K miles (52K km) and the platinums should be changed at 102K miles (164K km). The platinums last longer, but the coppers offer a better burn.

The spark plug tips can tell a story about misfire. White tips can indicate a lean mixture. Black, dry tips can indicate a rich mixture and black, oily tips may indicate oil burning from possible engine damage(?)

View attachment 58429

Another misfire issue can leave behind evidence of arcing to ground on both the sparkplug body and the rubber boot for the coil.
Some boots can be replaced without having to replace the entire coil.

View attachment 58430


View attachment 58431

Not related to misfire, but there is a TSB 18-058-17 for a PCM software update:
Thank you for all the information. My "Black Beauty" did crank up and run perfect home after cooling completely off for several hours. Now I will use the above information and begin the investigation as to why she is not feeling well! 🤣
 

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Well back to the drawing board! So after inspecting the coil packs and spark plugs I found that the spark plugs were champions (a shop did my last tune up) and they were slightly burnt. I replaced the plugs and all seemed fine for a few minutes then when coming to a stop she studdered and died. No CE light nothing. Got her to crank back up about 10 minutes later and got a cylinder 3 misfire so I replaced the coil packs. She drove fine for a few days however upon cranking she studders a lot and when coming to a stop. She's rough idling around d 600 rpms and the CE light comes and goes with these 3 codes

P0455
P0441
P0303

In that order. I've thought about it being the purge sensor however my OBD scanner says it passed the tests. The only failure on my scanner I see is in data language and I have no idea at this point.

Any ideas are appreciated as I am a single mom trying to repair my one and only car on a budget and at this point I'm lost as to what to do next! TIA

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OK, so it has settled on P0303. We should be able to rule out the spark plugs & coils as they have been replaced.
What was the Champion plug type? Do you have the Coppers or the Platinums? Were they the same type as what came out?

The P0441 & P0455 are evaporative (fuel) emissions codes and don't have anything to do with the way the car runs. They may be from a gas cap not sealing against the filler tube very well or the leak detector switch (ESIM).
Since this is will be a separate issue and not affecting the P0303, we will get back to them later.

Three things are needed for good cylinder combustion: a spark (plug & coil), fuel (all plug tips the same color(?) and no fuel injector fault codes) and compression (engine mechanical).
These are the Possible Causes for all 3 codes:

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First, is there any change in engine noise like clicking or tapping that wasn't there before? This is a 2.4L with MultiAir. The MultiAir is a variable (intake & exhaust) valve lift that is done hydraulically with engine oil pressure. It is important to use the recommended oil & filters. Wrong oil would likely affect all cylinders (P0300), not just # 3 (P0303).

If there was a vacuum leak on the #3 intake runner, that might make the mixture to #3 lean enough not to fire. You might hear a 'hiss' associated with a vacuum leak.

A faulty fuel injector is still possible without it setting a fault code (electrically OK). I have swapped fuel injectors between cylinders (they are all the same) to see if the misfire moves to the cylinder that now has the injector that came from #3. Fuel injectors are fairly reliable, but they can fail.

You've replaced coils & plugs, so we'll skip this.

The rest of the list I would group as 'engine mechanical' issues. I don't suspect internal engine damage and damage to the crankshaft position sensor & tone wheel could happen if someone was inside this engine, which I don't assume happened.

The car isn't drinking coolant? The level in the reservoir stays about the same? These cars are pretty good with head gaskets. I think that you would be experiencing additional symptoms if this were the head gasket failed.

A compression check may be good diagnostic tool for 'engine mechanical'. If #3 has lower compression than the other 3 cylinders, that could be the issue. Can you or your brother come up with a compression tester? Your friendly, local auto parts store may have a tool loan program where you could borrow it for a day. If something with the MultiAir valve control came apart or other cylinder problem occurred, a compression check may verify it. The MultiAir linkage is under the valve cover and a visual inspection may see a problem.

The last on the list is the PCM. They can fail, but it is last on the list because everything else must be ruled out before condemning a PCM. The 'driver' for the #3 coil and #3 fuel injector are inside. If the wiring harness and connectors are intact and in good shape with no rub-throughs or breaks, a failed PCM is a possibility.

Because 'engine mechanical' or a PCM might get costly, it may be worth paying a shop a 'diagnostic fee' (usually 1 hour labor), to confirm your own diagnosis before moving ahead and replacing parts.

You mention that the car drives OK for days (after sitting awhile?) and then goes back to 'acting up'. Intermittent electrical is fairly common thing where sometimes it is OK and sometimes it isn't. Does it run better when cold?
If you can find what can be 'teased' into making it fail or making it 'straighten out', you may have found your culprit.


 

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OK, so it has settled on P0303. We should be able to rule out the spark plugs & coils as they have been replaced.
What was the Champion plug type? Do you have the Coppers or the Platinums? Were they the same type as what came out?

The P0441 & P0455 are evaporative (fuel) emissions codes and don't have anything to do with the way the car runs. They may be from a gas cap not sealing against the filler tube very well or the leak detector switch (ESIM).
Since this is will be a separate issue and not affecting the P0303, we will get back to them later.

Three things are needed for good cylinder combustion: a spark (plug & coil), fuel (all plug tips the same color(?) and no fuel injector fault codes) and compression (engine mechanical).
These are the Possible Causes for all 3 codes:

View attachment 58541
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View attachment 58543
View attachment 58544

First, is there any change in engine noise like clicking or tapping that wasn't there before? This is a 2.4L with MultiAir. The MultiAir is a variable (intake & exhaust) valve lift that is done hydraulically with engine oil pressure. It is important to use the recommended oil & filters. Wrong oil would likely affect all cylinders (P0300), not just # 3 (P0303).

If there was a vacuum leak on the #3 intake runner, that might make the mixture to #3 lean enough not to fire. You might hear a 'hiss' associated with a vacuum leak.

A faulty fuel injector is still possible without it setting a fault code (electrically OK). I have swapped fuel injectors between cylinders (they are all the same) to see if the misfire moves to the cylinder that now has the injector that came from #3. Fuel injectors are fairly reliable, but they can fail.

You've replaced coils & plugs, so we'll skip this.

The rest of the list I would group as 'engine mechanical' issues. I don't suspect internal engine damage and damage to the crankshaft position sensor & tone wheel could happen if someone was inside this engine, which I don't assume happened.

The car isn't drinking coolant? The level in the reservoir stays about the same? These cars are pretty good with head gaskets. I think that you would be experiencing additional symptoms if this were the head gasket failed.

A compression check may be good diagnostic tool for 'engine mechanical'. If #3 has lower compression than the other 3 cylinders, that could be the issue. Can you or your brother come up with a compression tester? Your friendly, local auto parts store may have a tool loan program where you could borrow it for a day. If something with the MultiAir valve control came apart or other cylinder problem occurred, a compression check may verify it. The MultiAir linkage is under the valve cover and a visual inspection may see a problem.

The last on the list is the PCM. They can fail, but it is last on the list because everything else must be ruled out before condemning a PCM. The 'driver' for the #3 coil and #3 fuel injector are inside. If the wiring harness and connectors are intact and in good shape with no rub-throughs or breaks, a failed PCM is a possibility.

Because 'engine mechanical' or a PCM might get costly, it may be worth paying a shop a 'diagnostic fee' (usually 1 hour labor), to confirm your own diagnosis before moving ahead and replacing parts.

You mention that the car drives OK for days (after sitting awhile?) and then goes back to 'acting up'. Intermittent electrical is fairly common thing where sometimes it is OK and sometimes it isn't. Does it run better when cold?
If you can find what can be 'teased' into making it fail or making it 'straighten out', you may have found your culprit.


Thank you tremendously for all of your information. I'm still stuck but have tested theories. If I shut the car off after running a long while it either won't crank or does but runs very rough for a few minutes and levels out. Also I hear a small hissing sound to the back passenger side of the engine and after not adding coolant for about 8 days when I burped it and all I just had to refill it using almost a gallon of water. Also it only smokes white smoke when it's doing it studfering thing and now the check engine light has went out by itself and has not come back on even though the same issue has happened a couple of times. Does this help narrow things down any?

Thanks so much in advance!
 

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By 'adding almost a gallon of water', you meant a 50/50 mix of OAT-compatible coolant, right? You don't want to dilute your freeze protection or lower the boiling point.

Having spells of white smoke and rough running (stuttering) makes me uneasy. If coolant is dripping into the #3 cylinder past a failed head gasket, it could cause a misfire and show at the tailpipe as steam. I'm leaning toward 'engine mechanical' now. It is time for a compression test. Look for low compression on #3 compared to the other 3 cylinders.

If this problem is caught early, a head gasket alone should fix it. If this issue is allowed to continue for too long, it can wear piston rings and cylinder walls and get vastly more expensive.

The 'hiss' should be located. It may be normal? I was thinking of a vacuum leak by the intake manifold in the front. Avoid getting near the spinning belt and pulleys when locating a noise on a running engine.
 

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By 'adding almost a gallon of water', you meant a 50/50 mix of OAT-compatible coolant, right? You don't want to dilute your freeze protection or lower the boiling point.

Having spells of white smoke and rough running (stuttering) makes me uneasy. If coolant is dripping into the #3 cylinder past a failed head gasket, it could cause a misfire and show at the tailpipe as steam. I'm leaning toward 'engine mechanical' now. It is time for a compression test. Look for low compression on #3 compared to the other 3 cylinders.

If this problem is caught early, a head gasket alone should fix it. If this issue is allowed to continue for too long, it can wear piston rings and cylinder walls and get vastly more expensive.

The 'hiss' should be located. It may be normal? I was thinking of a vacuum leak by the intake manifold in the front. Avoid getting near the spinning belt and pulleys when locating a noise on a running engine.
So I havent been able to locate the issue then tonight I went to toy with it and the engine light was not on. So I tried to crank it and she wouldnt crank and the light came back on. Now there is no misfire codes and new codes of P0340 and P0365. I know these are for the camshaft position sensor however I do not know where it is located on this car (2013 200 2.4L) I recently had to replace the crankshaft position sensor so I know its close to the firewall on the backside, but any help locating the CAMSHAFT sensor would be appreciated. Also I noticed coolant coming from where the upper thermostat is so that may be my leak source. Still working on that issue.

BTW, I appreciate everyone's help, I'm feeling as though I need to just junk the car at this point.
 

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I'll admit that it isn't looking very good right now. Although the computer uses the cam and crank position sensor to run the engine, it is rare for 2 sensors to fail at the same time. The sensors themselves may be working perfectly and telling the truth.
The cam positions may be wrong. The camshaft positioning is controlled by oil pressure. I suspect that if the head gasket is leaking coolant into the motor oil, it is affecting the cam positions.

Note that at the top of the Possible Causes list, oil is the first thing to check. If coolant is mixed with oil, the dipstick may have 'mayonnaise' on it. Mayonnaise may also show on the underside of the oil filler cap.
If this is going on inside the engine, it may not have long to live. Save what you can now.



In winter with cold weather and short trips, some mayo might be normal (it's condensed water, not coolant).

I think that the next step should be confirming the problem, a diagnosis and repair estimate should follow. Begin with an evaluation of the whole car to see what you are up against and what you have to work with. Do you owe money on the car?

I wouldn't outright condemn the car if it needs a used engine replacement or engine repair. Used 2.4L are out there. If the rest of the car is in good shape, it may be worth the repair. If it needs other work besides the engine, you may want to consider your options.
The new and used car market is crazy right now because of supply chain issues and COVID. Used cars are going for unheard-of prices.

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I'll admit that it isn't looking very good right now. Although the computer uses the cam and crank position sensor to run the engine, it is rare for 2 sensors to fail at the same time. The sensors themselves may be working perfectly and telling the truth.
The cam positions may be wrong. The camshaft positioning is controlled by oil pressure. I suspect that if the head gasket is leaking coolant into the motor oil, it is affecting the cam positions.

Note that at the top of the Possible Causes list, oil is the first thing to check. If coolant is mixed with oil, the dipstick may have 'mayonnaise' on it. Mayonnaise may also show on the underside of the oil filler cap.
If this is going on inside the engine, it may not have long to live. Save what you can now.



In winter with cold weather and short trips, some mayo might be normal (it's condensed water, not coolant).

I think that the next step should be confirming the problem, a diagnosis and repair estimate should follow. Begin with an evaluation of the whole car to see what you are up against and what you have to work with. Do you owe money on the car?

I wouldn't outright condemn the car if it needs a used engine replacement or engine repair. Used 2.4L are out there. If the rest of the car is in good shape, it may be worth the repair. If it needs other work besides the engine, you may want to consider your options.
The new and used car market is crazy right now because of supply chain issues and COVID. Used cars are going for unheard-of prices.

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Thank you! My oil is clean and no signs of water on the dipstick and let me rephrase that the crankshaft position sensor was probably about a year ago I replaced it. I'm trying to locate the camshaft position sensor so I can replace it at this time. If it doesn't work I am going to put it in the shop when I can because of the market and then decide if it is worth keeping.

Thanks again for all your help and knowledge!
 

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I'm sorry. You asked that and I forgot.
I'm glad that the oil looks good. Maybe this isn't as bad as I thought.
This is one of the cam sensors, there is another one on the back-side Bank 1 (Sensor1 & Sensor2).

 

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