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"This is update 18.45.01 via USB mailed by FCA to owners with UConnect 8.4AN & 8.4A systems"

So, how do I request the USB stick to update to 18.45.01 myself?
 

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I think you are confusing this with the OTA [over the air] update from earlier this year. I believe that was software update 18.43.01. This is update 18.45.01 via USB mailed by FCA to owners with UConnect 8.4AN & 8.4A systems. This update via USB requires that you start the engine and are advised that vehicle should be in a well ventilated area.
No, not the OTA update. You can perform the update with USB with ignition on, engine off, despite the recommendation that came with the USB stick.
 

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15-20 minutes should not kill a good battery, but it could be connected to a charger if that's a concern. I prefer that to idling the car for 20 minutes.
The operative word, a "good" battery. These new 200's have a known issue of sending battery's to an early grave. The update is drawing more power then you might think, so leave the car run, or connect to a Battery Tender, or charger.
Besides, how much gas would it consume during that time ? Unless you have any other concerns ?

BTW, updated both of our 2015 model year vehicles. Took 30 minutes for my Durango, 20 minutes for the 200.
( All depends on what version software the vehicle currently has. )
 

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I guess we bucked the trend. My wife bought her 2012 new, and I replaced the battery proactively a few months ago. I bought a used 2011 a year ago, and changed the original battery out about 5 months ago.
Idling means parking outside, where it was 13 degrees today. You really shouldn't leave a car unattended running, and I don't like sitting in a car that long waiting for updates that may or may not take. My system update took 3x before it installed correctly and fully.
I also hate wasting gas. And idling for long periods isn't good for cars, especially the catcon, with no airflow around it. I'm in it for the long haul, I keep cars 300k miles.
 

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Older cars sure - idling isn't good.. but meh... newer cars are designed to idle for 20 minutes at least. That and stop and go traffic requires lots of idle time. Catcons are not going to overheat or clog unless something else is wrong.

Why would they engineer it to be remote started if it were that big of an issue?
 

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Older cars sure - idling isn't good.. but meh... newer cars are designed to idle for 20 minutes at least. That and stop and go traffic requires lots of idle time. Catcons are not going to overheat or clog unless something else is wrong.

Why would they engineer it to be remote started if it were that big of an issue?
Why indeed? What is different today to prevent the catcon from getting too hot at idle?
 

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Why indeed? What is different today to prevent the catcon from getting too hot at idle?
Here's a good article for you below. It's in layman's terms. If you'd like specific details as to the differences in emissions equipment between your 1992 Dodge Shadow or whatever you had for 850,000 miles without ever changing wheel bearings and a vehicle made in the past 7 years - we can go into that in another thread since this is going off topic - but I have already done my research, then again I don't feel like doing anymore. Believe what you want. Cars are the same from 1975 - present.

 
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Extended periods of idling have been much less risky since EFI came around in the mid-'80's. Carburetors seem to idle rich, especially cold with the choke on.
A battery charger also works fine to keep the battery from discharging during long 'key-on' periods.
 
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