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I have a 2016 200S that I purchased about a year ago and I am beginning to have some major issues with my air conditioning.

My AC compressor failed about three months ago, missed warranty by about 5k miles, and I got that replaced. But the mechanic that replaced it said he did not have the proper refrigerant to recharge the system. I found that my vehicle takes r1234yf and it cannot be recharged using typical AC recharge techniques.

I bought a DIY recharge kit from amazon and now I am having trouble getting the compressor to take the charge. I am not great with cars, but have some knowledge, and it seems as if the pressure in the system is too high for the refrigerant to cycle through.

Has anyone dealt with recharging their r1234yf refrigerant in their 200? If so were you able to do it yourself, or did you have to take it to a dealer?

I called the dealership I bought it from and they told me that no matter what I have to get a diagnostics ran on the AC unit before servicing. That itself runs $360 and I truly cannot afford that just for cold air.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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Proper servicing of A/C systems requires proper diagnosis and servicing. Any mechanic replacing a compressor should also be qualified to recharge it. Since he apparently was not, you need to take it somewhere where they can service the new refrigerant.

You cannot just add refrigerant to an empty system. It is full of air and moisture, both of which will not only corrode the system internally, but also take up the volume that the refrigerant needs to occupy. A vacuum pump and the knowledge of how to recharge this system are required. Sorry, there is no way to get around paying a professional. You risk ruining the system and causing a lot more damage than what you are being quoted now.
 

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You can put it under a vacuum for about an hour to get all the moisture and air out of it. Any ac machine can do it.
Ate you in Michigan ?
 

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My rebuilt "salvage" 2016 200s had damage to the condenser, compressor, and the AC lines... I replaced both and THEN found that the system was originally charged with R1234yf refrigerant... I found that this "new" refrigerant was VERY expensive ($40 for an 8oz can) and that my refrigeration gauge connections wouldn't fit the Chrysler lines....
Some research on R1234yf and R134A I found that they are almost EXACTLY the same in use but the R1234yf supposedly broke down faster in the Ozone layer than R134A... I found that there was adaptor connectors that worked with the R1234yf fittings that once again allowed me to use my vacuum pump and gauges and also recharge the now EMPTY AC system with R134A... There was susposable problems with incompatibility with the lubricating oil but I added some PAG46... The system runs just fine.... Evacuating the system is a MUST for either refrigerant as they react with "air" to form an acid that will attack the system... I'm riding cool for much less.. Do a search for R1234yf and R134A compatibility... As of the date of this posting there is NO law against doing this although I'm sure they will enact one and adaptors are now available on ebay..
Dave

BTW... The label on the compressor says for use with R1234yf OR R134A :)
 

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My rebuilt "salvage" 2016 200s had damage to the condenser, compressor, and the AC lines... I replaced both and THEN found that the system was originally charged with R1234yf refrigerant... I found that this "new" refrigerant was VERY expensive ($40 for an 8oz can) and that my refrigeration gauge connections wouldn't fit the Chrysler lines....
Some research on R1234yf and R134A I found that they are almost EXACTLY the same in use but the R1234yf supposedly broke down faster in the Ozone layer than R134A... I found that there was adaptor connectors that worked with the R1234yf fittings that once again allowed me to use my vacuum pump and gauges and also recharge the now EMPTY AC system with R134A... There was susposable problems with incompatibility with the lubricating oil but I added some PAG46... The system runs just fine.... Evacuating the system is a MUST for either refrigerant as they react with "air" to form an acid that will attack the system... I'm riding cool for much less.. Do a search for R1234yf and R134A compatibility... As of the date of this posting there is NO law against doing this although I'm sure they will enact one and adaptors are now available on ebay..
Dave

BTW... The label on the compressor says for use with R1234yf OR R134A /forum/images/smilies/smile.png
I develop and test automotive AC systems for a living. I'm not sure what you have read, but the cooling properties are very different. The cooling plateau ( the efficiency ) is different.The charge amount is also different. If you filled to the same YF amount, you are almost 100-150 grams overcharged. So different in fact that we had to make changes to the AC lines themselves. We had to install an IHX. See the return line with the small lines also going to it? It's another heat exchanger. The TXV also has a completely different set point. So different in fact that we NEVER run 134 on an IHX system. The evap freezes over too fast and prematurely wears out your compressor since its constantly swashing down to a non flow point to unfreeze your evap. So the money you saved may cost you a prematurely failing compressor and a leaky evap since they were never designed to be frozen over. YF really sucks as a refrigerant, but the while system was designed around it. Only thing you have going for you is all the ND oils used for YF are backward comparable with 134.
 

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Funny the damaged OEM compressor that came with the salvaged car and the replacement compressor state BOTH R1234yf and R134A can be used with it... The evaporator and condenser don't care what refrigerant is used...
I can post this attached label... Yes you do use less refrigerant and I adjusted the charge for it so your comment about the compressor damage seams not valid...

The actual performance of the two is very similar and an article from Purdue University touts how interchangeable they are... They even recommend that "when R1234yf becomes the standard that R134A systems can use it"

https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2084&context=iracc

So the lubrication in the R1234yf system is compatible, the compressor that Chrysler installed as OEM is compatible
The big difference claimed is how fast it breaks down in the Ozone layer... but when R134A came out it was also claimed to be the saviour to global warming over R12...

The difference is the fittings and the more efficient refrigeration lines that allow lower heat transfer losses...
The lubrication used in a R134A system is NOT compatible with R1234yf though...

I'm sure that contamination to your recovery and recharging systems in a commercial operation such as yours will be a concern just as when systems that ran R12 were recharged with R134A .... BUT... I'm NOT going to recharge systems as a living... and know that with common sense my future R1234yf system will run just fine...
When R1234yf sells for under $3.00 for a 12oz can then I may use it in the future... Until then I'll evacuate and recharge my systems with R134A... Global Warming BS is just that... "junk science"...
You MUST toe the line and follow what the government says but others can do as they choose...
Dave
 

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Funny the damaged OEM compressor that came with the salvaged car and the replacement compressor state BOTH R1234yf and R134A can be used with it... The evaporator and condenser don't care what refrigerant is used...
I can post this attached label... Yes you do use less refrigerant and I adjusted the charge for it so your comment about the compressor damage seams not valid...

The actual performance of the two is very similar and an article from Purdue University touts how interchangeable they are... They even recommend that "when R1234yf becomes the standard that R134A systems can use it"

https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2084&context=iracc

So the lubrication in the R1234yf system is compatible, the compressor that Chrysler installed as OEM is compatible
The big difference claimed is how fast it breaks down in the Ozone layer... but when R134A came out it was also claimed to be the saviour to global warming over R12...

The difference is the fittings and the more efficient refrigeration lines that allow lower heat transfer losses...
The lubrication used in a R134A system is NOT compatible with R1234yf though...

I'm sure that contamination to your recovery and recharging systems in a commercial operation such as yours will be a concern just as when systems that ran R12 were recharged with R134A .... BUT... I'm NOT going to recharge systems as a living... and know that with common sense my future R1234yf system will run just fine...
When R1234yf sells for under $3.00 for a 12oz can then I may use it in the future... Until then I'll evacuate and recharge my systems with R134A... Global Warming BS is just that... "junk science"...
You MUST toe the line and follow what the government says but others can do as they choose...
Dave
Since you know everything you should come work for us at Denso. You know, the worlds biggest automotive HVAC supplier. We sell more automotive HVAC units than our 4 other competitors COMBINED.
 

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Your the one that said what I did wouldn't work and that R134a was not compatible with the system...
So by your own logic you must be SO SMART because you work at Denso.. but that still didn't help the OP with your posts.... Did you get a chance to look at the label on the compressor in your 200?...
Also being the "biggest" doesn't make a company the "best"...and not always will your/their answers be the right ones... Look at the recalls from the biggest car manufacturers...Mistakes are made...
I like Denso and use their coil packs and spark plugs but that doesn't make them "gods"...

Your comment on "the evac freezes over too fast" is handled by a thermistor used in all car AC systems that opens the compressor clutch when the evaporator begins to get "too cold"

What I originally said was that what I did worked to the original poster and you said It would destroy the system...
It works, it's compatible, and even Chrysler used a compatible compressor so in this case you are wrong...They used R1234yf because the HAD TO... Yes in instances where you "develop" systems your logic may be true but not this case and I offered an answer that works for a 2015/2016/2017 Chrysler 200 for the average owner... What did you offer him?

Will your 200 pass a government eCheck with it's Mods done to the PCM? and the "Player3 ECM and TCM tunes...Probably not...You changed parts from the original Chrysler OEM emissions tests...and that's illegal also...

Enough of this childish bs I have better things to do..
 

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Your the one that said what I did wouldn't work and that R134a was not compatible with the system...
Never said it wasn't compatible, I said we never run 134 on an IHX system.

So by your own logic you must be SO SMART because you work at Denso.. but that still didn't help the OP with your posts.... Did you get a chance to look at the label on the compressor in your 200?...
That compressor is used on many different markets including china which doesn't use YF



Your comment on "the evac freezes over too fast" is handled by a thermistor used in all car AC systems that opens the compressor clutch when the evaporator begins to get "too cold"
We haven't cycled the clutch in a long time. These are variable displacement compressors, so when the thermistor sends a signal to the compressor it no longer turns the clutch off, it changes the internal stoke of the compressor. If it is constantly going back and forth internally, you will see premature wear and compressor failure. What did you do to change the set point of the TXV?


What I originally said was that what I did worked to the original poster and you said It would destroy the system...
It works, it's compatible, and even Chrysler used a compatible compressor so in this case you are wrong...They used R1234yf because the HAD TO... Yes in instances where you "develop" systems your logic may be true but not this case and I offered an answer that works for a 2015/2016/2017 Chrysler 200 for the average owner... What did you offer him?
So much wrong in the above statement I don't know where to begin. To the OP : In my professional opinion, I do not recommend it.

Will your 200 pass a government eCheck with it's Mods done to the PCM? and the "Player3 ECM and TCM tunes...Probably not...You changed parts from the original Chrysler OEM emissions tests...and that's illegal also..
We don't have smog here so there are no checks. I'm not sure what a government eCheck is? Is that like an EBT card? All of my parts are 50 state legal for sale in California so I don't know what you are getting at. And by your logic, YOU went against the EPA by installing 134.

You can run non-detergent 30 weight oil in your engine for a while, but over time, it will kill your engine. Just because you rigged something up that works now, doesn't mean it will last.

You are that guy aren't you?
The guy that argues with his doctor over some stuff he read off of Web MD?
 

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Global Warming BS is just that... "junk science"...
You MUST toe the line and follow what the government says but others can do as they choose...
Dave


Anyone who believes that Global Warming isn't real really isn't very smart. You don't have to believe in science, but it is still true.

 

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Proper servicing of A/C systems requires proper diagnosis and servicing. Any mechanic replacing a compressor should also be qualified to recharge it. Since he apparently was not, you need to take it somewhere where they can service the new refrigerant.

You cannot just add refrigerant to an empty system. It is full of air and moisture, both of which will not only corrode the system internally, but also take up the volume that the refrigerant needs to occupy. A vacuum pump and the knowledge of how to recharge this system are required. Sorry, there is no way to get around paying a professional. You risk ruining the system and causing a lot more damage than what you are being quoted now.
allen998 - above is the best advise on here in my opinion.

Unless your mechanic or the person you are getting advise from has their HVAC certification - it's all talk. Maybe ask if anyone has their HVAC certification/has experience on here? As stated above this isn't something that's cheap or easily serviceable etc... you can do $$$$$ of damage easily.

Get it done right from a qualified experienced professional.



There's some obvious mis-information contained in this thread, and no problem debating etc.. but let's try not to insult other members.
 

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To forum members... Where I stand and why...

The original poster asked " Has anyone dealt with recharging their r1234yf refrigerant in their 200? If so were you able to do it yourself, or did you have to take it to a dealer?"

Being a member of this forum I answered that question with what I found worked without any problems to the OP...

I understand him not wanting to spend a lot of money at the Chrysler dealership for something he really didn't need done... his quote "I called the dealership I bought it from and they told me that no matter what I have to get a diagnostics ran on the AC unit before servicing. That itself runs $360 and I truly cannot afford that just for cold air."
Not everyone can afford or wish to be racked by a dealer ... It is HIS choice to look for suggestions and do his own work just as it is mine...

His last sentence was "Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!"

That's what I went out of my way to do for him... He could take or leave my thoughts and/or suggestions...
If the OP wishes to use R1234yf that is totally up to him... I found through research that Purdue had tested both refrigerants and found them to be very similar and I went with that research finding...

The OP could do a system evacuation and recharge it successfully without a dealership with a little research and a few pieces of AC recharging equipment available to anyone who wishes to do their own work...

I was told by a poster here that what I did would not work on my 2016 200s and I would have "problems" with the compressor failing... The AC system works just fine even with a long trip under it's belt.. I was also told that the two refrigerants were not compatible and they are... Yes I know that there have been changes to accommodate R1234yf (like the heat exchanger lines) which both my 200 and the OP have those (minor changes with the expansion valve body) but like I said the AC works fine... I do not have problems with unusually "high pressure" at the compressor from a frozen evaporator or AC lines... and my compressor does NOT cycle because of it... and yes as the Denso guy admitted the compressor was designed to WORK with BOTH refrigerants.. (thank you for admitting that this compressor WILL work like I said)... The modulating valve on the back of the compressor WILL change the flow of the refrigerant to accommodate the needs of the system and the HVAC computer can/will provide these changes as needed...

The AC system in my car was compromised when I got it salvaged ..(Condenser/AC lines/Compressor) along with $3700 worth of replacement parts... There was NO refrigeration gas within the system... I chose to recharge this car with a purely legal off the shelf refrigerant ...R134A instead of R1234yf in a system that does not have any leaks (tested to a vacuum close to -30psi and then retested a day later)...

I can be attacked for providing help when asked with making the OPs AC work... but it's OK and it can be ignored here when others "MOD" their cars ... and even admit to it by their sigs...

Echeck is the name for Ohio's Emissions testing stations... and ModdedAWD's 200 would not pass US Government nor Ohio emissions tests because of the modifications both hardware and software changes...
He chooses to ignore one clean air act EPA law and I choose to ignore your version of the EPA clean air act laws..

Every "classic" car that is/was retrofitted from R12 to R134A is also "illegal"... The old R12 systems leak. They were not designed for for R134A and need recharging often releasing R134A... Where's the EPA "police"... going after them? They make illogical and non-enforceable laws

Just because you can buy NON-OEM or OEM parts in all 50 states doesn't make it legal to use them on your cars (there are EPA laws on modifying engine emmissions)...

I run only Valvoline Full Synthetic oil and transmission fluids, use OEM oil filters, and I do listen to advise that makes sense but doctors also are fallible...
Our family doctor recently said my wife had problems with irritable bowel syndrome and she nearly died with a ruptured appendix.. I chose to research beyond that diagnosis and she is alive today because of it.. .

BTW...Global Warming has scientists on both sides pro and con and I choose to believe it is bs...

My thoughts and opinions....Yours may be different... I may have different opinions, I try not to attack fellow members, but I will respond with facts when challenged...
Dave
 

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I can be attacked for providing help when asked with making the OPs AC work... but it's OK and it can be ignored here when others "MOD" their cars ... and even admit to it by their sigs...

Echeck is the name for Ohio's Emissions testing stations... and ModdedAWD's 200 would not pass US Government nor Ohio emissions tests because of the modifications both hardware and software changes...
He chooses to ignore one clean air act EPA law and I choose to ignore your version of the EPA clean air act laws..
Who actually attacked you? I saw where someone disagreed with you and stated you were wrong. Nothing wrong with pointing out what someone thinks is mis-information - unless it becomes beating a dead horse and nothing productive comes of it besides back and forth bickering - or if a bunch of personal insults are used in the process of disagreement, If that happens I will lock the thread.

I am carefully reading through the thread again, and I am not seeing any actual attacks. There were some not so nice implications near the end after your rant about EPA laws. I actually agree thinking global warming isn't real is a bit on the side of thinking the earth isn't spherical. My opinion. There's a whole community that believes the earth is flat. I bet they have scientists too. There's a whole documentary about "flat earthers (?)" on Netflix... Just to clarify, I do think global warming is a real thing and the earth is round/spherical. :)

Speaking of laws - who was talking about emissions laws or EPA laws before you brought it up? I genuinely could have missed it, but I only noticed you talking about that. I know the original poster didn't ask about that. I don't think anyone is worried about if ModdedAWD... modifies... his 200 or not. Actually it would be hilarious if he didn't considering his forum handle. Many members of this forum have modified their 200, not that anything other than AC modifications or procedures are relevant to the topic.
 

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I laughed at some of the posts here. I'm not sure why Dave200s is so fixated on EPA refrigerant laws. I never mentioned anything about it.

Dave, ALL of my bolt ons are 50 state legal and carry a CARB OE number for emission compliance. They all came with a little sticker to affix to your car for inspectors.


My opinion is based on the automotive A/C system testing I have been doing since 2013.
All of my statements we're based on real failures that I saw during testing, not on a purdue university study.
I don't like reckless misinformation. Dave200s was posting information that could cause more harm then good.
I know I was a little heated, and I apologize of I offended anyone.
 

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I laughed at some of the posts here. I'm not sure why Dave200s is so fixated on EPA refrigerant laws. I never mentioned anything about it.

Dave, ALL of my bolt ons are 50 state legal and carry a CARB OE number for emission compliance. They all came with a little sticker to affix to your car for inspectors.


My opinion is based on the automotive A/C system testing I have been doing since 2013.
All of my statements we're based on real failures that I saw during testing, not on a purdue university study.
I don't like reckless misinformation. Dave200s was posting information that could cause more harm then good.
I know I was a little heated, and I apologize of I offended anyone.
Your information/opinion is very much appreciated and no problems whatsoever with the way you presented it. Thanks for sharing your professional expertise.

Just wanted to make very clear I 100% believe the earth is spherical, not flat. :)
 
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