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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I'm driving my rpms feel low. At 55 to 60 I am running around 1 to 1.2k rpm while keeping steady speed. Is this normal for a v6? I have a 2014 S 3.6l. Also is there a separate relay for fuel pump or is it all part of the tipm setup?
 

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2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
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This is the 6-speed? 6 is an overdrive & at a steady highway cruise, the torque converter locks for 1:1.
You want to keep RPMs low for best fuel economy. If it needs more torque, the converter will unlock & it may downshift to a lower gear.
Notice that there are two 4th gears. 4 is used for the normal upshifting sequence. 4' (4-prime) is used as a passing gear upon downshifting as conditions permit.
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There is no serviceable fuel pump fuse or relay in the TIPM.
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If you bump the stick to the right, can you upshift 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 then into 6th when you turn A/S off?
I think they were all 6-speed (62TE) by 2013. The 4-speed (41TE) were the basic transaxle for the earlier 4-cyls.
 

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At 50-60 mph you will be in 6th 'gear' and 1200 rpm is normal. As 200_s_awd noted, the 4-speed was only on early 200's with the 4-banger typically for rental cars and fleets. All 3.6l came with the 62te (6-speed).

When running at 60 mph and dropping to auto-shift, I see '6' displayed (2014 2.4l). There may be programming with auto-stick to limit an a/s up-shift to '6' as it is considered an overdrive gear and not relevant when manually shifting (SWAG on my part).

Just curious, why are you asking about the fuel pump relay?.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm still having an issue with random stalls. When it stalls an cuts power. It won't start right up. The fuel pump doesn't prime when I turn key to on. After 5 or so min it's like the system resets, fuel pump primes an it starts up. I wasn't sure if it had a separate relay. I have changed the crankshaft position sensor last week. I'm at a loss as to why it is still randomly stalling an cut power. It leaves no codes an it's happening at random. No specific driving condition causes it. I'm just wondering if a faulty pump can cause it. Oil level is at good level via dip stick.
 

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There was an improved software released in 2016. I think they ran & shifted noticeably nicer after the flash. I recommended it if it hasn't been done. The dealer can look up the past dealer history.

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My experience with a fuel pump failing is a sputtering and eventual stalling of the engine as the fuel pressure drops. Rarely would the engine just quit when the pump fails.

When the engine stalls are there any lamps that turn on in the instrument cluster or any lamps randomly turning on while driving? Are there any diagnostic trouble codes, particularly stored codes? Not all codes will light the check engine lamp and stored codes will give a bit of past history and with the proper OBD scanner will give you a data freeze frame when the code was triggered.

What is the condition and age of the battery? Chrysler computer modules do not tolerate low voltage well which a weak/failing battery will cause. Are the cable connections clean and tight? You can view the battery terminals looking down behind past the left headlamp and check visually for corrosion.

The recall involves the replacement of the ORC module and likely require a software update. Not certain if the dealer would include any other software updates at no charge. If there is a charge, it is typically 1 hour of labor.
 

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It is not a 'recall', but a TSB (technical service bulletin). The PCM, its software & the catalytic converter are under an 8yr/80K mile Extended Federal Emission warranty (which has expired).
When you go in for your recall, you might ask if the PCM update shows as done.
1 hour labor is the generally accepted 'diagnostic fee'. It is also the 'minimum charge at many shops. The shop policies should be explained to you by the Service Advisor at write-up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
No lights illuminate when it stalls. Just loss of power, loss or power steering and tight brake pedal. Then it takes a little bit for power to finally cycle the fuel pump. Battery an alt test both show requirements met as far as voltage, CCA, amperes, etc.. Terminals are free from corrosion. Today I drove it with no issues thus far. Yesterday it stalled out twice on my way from work to home about 10 miles on one lane roads. It's weird, but I never get a mil or anything. Code readers never return a p code. I do have a abs issue with the abs module which I've ordered an will be replacing soon.

I will find out about the update when I contact my dealer for the recall.
 

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Not everything will set a fault code. It would be too easy if it did.
Somehow the PCM is 'believing' everything it is seeing in the way of sensor inputs. Only when the PCM sees something that doesn't make sense, will it set a code.
There is a section in the service manual for 'no code' diagnostics.
If the engine stops turning, you will lose power steering and with no intake vacuum, you will have no power brakes.

I have road tested cars with a data recorder plugged into the diagnostic connector waiting for a stall. Sometimes I get to borrow the car overnight.
We have a 'Co-pilot' tool that I can program what to look for and hook it up in the customer's car so they can drive it until it fails. They just have to press a trigger button and the past 90 seconds of engine data is stored. It can store up to 3 separate events.
Back at the shop, I can read the graphs of what the car was doing,,,or not doing. It is a great tool for intermittents that never act up when I want them to.

You can also hook up a fuel pressure gauge and pin it under a wiper blade while driving. Make sure there are no fuel leaks and keep the hose away from hot or spinning components before closing the hood for a drive.
 
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