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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
That title is only to serve the frustrated 2012 Chrysler 200 convertible owners who tried to find the part they need described in the owner's manual which had a vague, one sentence reference to such a part as written above. There is no use trying to Google that term unless you ended up here which is a good thing. It does not exist! That part's actual description is actually "Quarter Trim Access Door (right or left) and there are a few different part numbers for it depending on the year and trim color. The bad news is that these parts, especially the left side, are discontinued, scarce and priced over $200 by most Mopar vendors, a few claiming to have one. Here is a good starter Link for more part number references and diagram information:


Now for a recap of what I have learned to date with both of mine non-functional. First, they are truly just spring loaded, mechanically activated devices with no electric or hydraulic requirements. It is a plastic assembly made up of 3 parts which can be carefully disassembled for repair efforts if nothing is actually broken. My left one was jammed up tight in a warped rail system that another Sebring poster once claimed that his friend had fixed with heat to normal operation again. After looking closely at mine I am very hopeful of doing the same. I have not examined the right one yet but am pretty sure that I will find the same condition. Once the assembly is free of the rear interior panel, begin by patiently prying off the two retainer rings from the posts on the back side of door itself. That lets you disassemble the 3 pieces as they need to be for a factory style reassembly. The retainer rings look like nylon at first glance but are metal and can later be pounded flat and reused. Don't break off the posts. Fortunately the wound up strip spring will not self destruct when slid forward out of its chassis retainer slots which is a real plus as anyone working with springs knows.

Ok, but how do you get to this point you ask. Quite easily.
1. Put your top down but stop before the trunk closes.
2. Put your seats into the most forward positions and fold the seat backs over them.
3. Pop your rear seat loose by pulling up on the front corners if you are strong, or by prying them up with a jury rigged lever of some sort like my old carcass had to do. Set it out of the way.
4. Now you remove the rear seat back and I have seen variations on You tube by year. These steps are for my 2012 Limited, but are essentially adaptable to any convertible model. First remove the nuts or bolts that fasten the seat belts to the auto chassis. I had one 11/16 nut, some videos have shown two.
5. For caution, lay a heavy rag on the now exposed bottom stud to avoid any potential upholstery puncture.
6. Pop off the long panel just behind the rear headrests with straight up movements along the length.
7. Remove the two 11/16 bolts that fasten the seat back to the chassis.
8. Lay the seat belts out of the way over the seat back onto the top.
9. Fold the hinged seat back forward to the floor.
10. Remove the four 11/16 nuts securing the pipe hinge to the chassis.
11. Lift the seat back out and set aside.
12. Each side panel access is the same from 12 on. First pull the long cup holder straight up and set aside.
13. Remove the 1 Phillips head screw behind the armrest using caution not to strip the head of it it due to the angle of your tool you if you don't have a stubby or ratchet. My screwdriver had a good bite and I pressed hard to keep it.
14. Unless you had hidden panel screws behind the seat back (I did not) panel removal is now mostly a pull straight out and/or up operation with some finesse as needed. You do not need to remove the threshold as it is under the panel end and at that location the panel pops up. There are no wiring connections or paddings to worry about. However you will probably need to pull a few yellow plugs from the chassis and slide them back into the panel slots before panel re-installation. If you have come this far, no further explanation is needed for technique.
15. Lay the panel on a flat surface with the interior of it up.
16. Spot the 4 Phillips head screws that secure the "Quarter Trim Access Door" assembly to the white framework and remove them.
17. The assembly now slides out freely from its holder for you to examine, disassemble, repair or replace as described at the top of this post. For $200+ if you can find one, not to mention dealer labor, get creative.

Next day Edit: I have now removed both the left and right assemblies and this picture is of them side by side. The left one is shown in its 3 pieces and the right one, before disassembly with the exact same problem only more severe. If you can work the assembly free of its jam without causing more damage it is easier to remove the retaining rings, but not necessary. My right one has a mfg date of 02/16, so it was replaced probably just before I bought the car. Lousy design for sure and horribly expensive for what it is.
Side by Side L&R.jpg


This one is of the Jam very likely to occur on this product: Notice how the sliding GUIDE has gone underneath the channel and jammed up tight, also warping the **** out of the platform above it.
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This shot shows how the right one actually has a break in the guide will also need to be addressed if repair is even possible. This material is known as PA6 GF30 and is commonly used in the automotive industry. It is a glass reinforced mix and may be tricky to put near melt temp to unwarp. I am going to consult with both a local body shop and plastic manufacturer on Monday to see how (if) it can be done and decide if it is within my wheelhouse to do or have one of them do it for me. This one part basically condemns the older Chrysler convertible lineup well before their time.
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FINAL EDIT:
Sunday afternoon with nothing to lose and since the right one was worst and had a small break, I clamped the channel part up straight & flush in two places using cut off paint sticks as front and back stiffeners. I then baked it in a preheated oven at 375 (191C) degrees Fahrenheit for 20 minutes. Then I submerged it into a sink of cold water for another 15 minutes. I left the clamps in place for two more hours. All this was on instinct as in published Centigrade temperatures a short service life for this PA6 30F 30%glass fiber reinforced Polyamide is 180C and its melting point is 218C (356F and 456F). I chose higher than the short service life (to stress it) and lower than melting point for my test run.

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I also used an electronics soldering iron to fuse the now hidden crack seen in the picture (before removing the clamps) and it seems to have welded the crack to some extent, at least until the next jam. I recovered the first two retainer rings from the left assembly but split the ones from the right. No big deal, standard hardware or even star washers are readily available.

Please realize that I have shared this post as a diary type writing for informational purposes only and assume absolutely no liability for it especially with regard to all things related to PA6 CF30. This was a personal trial and error process and is due no professional interpretation whatsoever. Just saying now.

One last note. After studying the part I call the guide over and over I could still not readily determine if it too was warped or manufactured with its twists and misalignments. I decided to leave well enough alone and reassembled the device without adjusting the guide.

Overall Result for both refurbished Right and Left "Flipper Doors": See for yourself.


Good luck to you members as well.
Rick
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Total failure to both during very first installed test operation. Am very disapointed!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I don't know if this procedure helps. They are very specific about adjusting guides and door alignment before finally tightening the screws:
I truly appreciate the info 200_S_AWD, but having just installed them those instructions are not related to the operation, but just the final door centering on the gap front or back but with nothing to visually verify until the rear panels are re-installed and in full operation.

I just removed the assemblies again and decided to try baking them one more time, but this time the guides as well as I am now certain they cannot have a twist in them that acts like a scoop under the rail with the slightest incentive. I have never seen a good one so I missed that detail by my own indecision.

Thanks again 200_S_AWD
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I don't know if this procedure helps. They are very specific about adjusting guides and door alignment before finally tightening the screws:
Success at Last! Yes the guides (pushrods) were torqued, not bent, and 5 minutes in boiling water, a twist with potholders and submerse in cold water got the top surface planes in alignment again, or at least much better. This was not the solution however because the very design of this assembly begs the guides to enter their own insertion slots sooner or later and jam up totally. The solution was to prevent this from ever happening again by bridging the slot. I accomplished this by adding two thin, pre-drilled galvanized strips to the lifters with small self tapping screws. Keep the holes furthest from the guide as low as possible or you may have to grind the heads down just a bit for clearance. In any case you will need to cut off these same screws flush underneath and grind down any residual edges. The way they should have been designed in the first place. Tip: Mount the strips, then temporarily remove the front screws for guide re-installation. I replaced all retainer rings from standard hardware store stock just to be sure of grip. Here is the revised version of my "Flipper Doors":
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