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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
3 times in the past 2 months my 2011 Chrysler 200 has stalled while driving. It won't restart for about 45 minutes. I've been lucky so far where I could pull over to a safe area, but worried that this won't always be the case. Mechanic can't find problem because by the time they get the car, it runs fine. Called Chrysler, but they were no help.
 

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2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
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Welcome to the forums. Intermittent electrical can be very frustrating. I would not try to throw parts at it, but try to diagnose it while the problem is active.
You may not have any stored fault codes. Not everything will set a code. Always diagnose first.
Is it spark or fuel? It may be temperature related?
Pull a coil and install a noid light. Position the light so you can see it from the drivers seat while cranking the car over. This will check for spark.
Carry a can of throttle body (or carb) cleaner. Give a shot into the throttle body and crank the car over. If it fires up briefly, you have a fuel supply problem. Possibly, but not necessarily the fuel pump. (you should hear it hum for a second under the rear seat after rolling the key on with everything quiet).
If the injectors are staying closed (no signal?), you will still have no fuel to the cylinders, even with good fuel pressure.
A cheap OBDII scan tool can look for missing cam or crank position sensor signals. Some can do data recording to graph what was lost at the point of stall. Can you borrow or rent one?
At work, we have a STARMobile/Co-pilot data recorder for these cases. We keep an open repair order and send the customer out to drive it until the problem occurs. We can then watch preloaded inputs and outputs back at the shop to determine what quit first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome to the forums. Intermittent electrical can be very frustrating. I would not try to throw parts at it, but try to diagnose it while the problem is active.
You may not have any stored fault codes. Not everything will set a code. Always diagnose first.
Is it spark or fuel? It may be temperature related?
Pull a coil and install a noid light. Position the light so you can see it from the drivers seat while cranking the car over. This will check for spark.
Carry a can of throttle body (or carb) cleaner. Give a shot into the throttle body and crank the car over. If it fires up briefly, you have a fuel supply problem. Possibly, but not necessarily the fuel pump. (you should hear it hum for a second under the rear seat after rolling the key on with everything quiet).
If the injectors are staying closed (no signal?), you will still have no fuel to the cylinders, even with good fuel pressure.
A cheap OBDII scan tool can look for missing cam or crank position sensor signals. Some can do data recording to graph what was lost at the point of stall. Can you borrow or rent one?
At work, we have a STARMobile/Co-pilot data recorder for these cases. We keep an open repair order and send the customer out to drive it until the problem occurs. We can then watch preloaded inputs and outputs back at the shop to determine what quit first.
Thanks. I'm not very mechanically inclined, so I am limited. I will look into these ideas. Also, all 3!times it happened in the same place on the same road. It's an overpass where the road inclines before declining. It stalls just before the top of the incline.
 

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2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
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You want it to fail in order to find it, although it would be nice if the failure could be planned for.
Temperatures would rise as a car ascended a hill. Does it have to fully warm to occur? Has it ever happened say, in the first 10 minutes of driving?
Discuss this with your technician, as his presence during a stall would be a golden opprtunity. Pack a toolbox and carry a charged phone.
I knew a guy that emptied a bucket of ice water on the (suspect) crank sensor to get spark again. Although I didn't particularly agree with his method, he found the problem and got home safely.
 
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