Chrysler 200 Forum banner
21 - 30 of 30 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,622 Posts
Although we have factory installed gauges, they are actually pretty accurate.
What temperature does it run at normally? Sure cant tell by looking at the gauge. See... that's all I mean by "crappy". The higher end vehicles like the 300 tell you the coolant temp in DEGREES, oil pressure in PSI, voltage in numbers etc.. Some but few cars have OEM gauges that give you this information - so most vehicles have crappy gauges in my book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
It's the dumbing down of vehicles for consumers who continuously ask to be less involved with their cars. I recall seeing a car with just two gauges: speed and fuel. Couldn't help but laugh, but I'm sure that's all that 99% of drivers use.

As for mine, it runs right as pictured in the summer. At times throughout winter, I'd make 100+ mile trips and it would barely reach above 1/4. I would have questioned it, but this winter has been exceptionally cold, and my previous Chrysler behaved exactly the same way. Mileage was still reasonable for winter, so it must have been satisfied still.

From what I understand, you don't have to worry about it until it climbs to 3/4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Take a look at the picture again. See he big H on the top? That means Hot. See the C? That means cold. You are in the middle. That = good. Why would you possibly think you are running hot when you are right in the middle? What's the point of the gauge if when it reads right in the middle you worry? May as well not even have one.
yeah you may as well not have friends with that kind of response obviously this guy doesn't know hence why he is posting a question idiot. And yes half or just below is a great operating temperature for most cars especially Chrysler products my 300 has ran that same temp on the gauge since bought new it's very normal.
 

·
Administrator
2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
Joined
·
2,077 Posts
If gauges were linear as they were in the old days, it could create owner guage-anxiety. The mid-point of the gauge has a 'buffer zone' that tries to slow needle movement around expected operating temperatures/pressures.
Oil pressure gauges (if the car had one) are even more inaccurate. An acceptable warm idle reading would be 10 PSI. The low pressure oil light switch closes at 4 PSI to turn on the red oil light. A cold arctic-type start could reach 80 PSI and open the pressure-relief valve. Normal road-going oil pressure should be 40-60 PSI.
Because of modern engines with hydraulically-controlled Multiair, VVT and MDS, the PCM keeps a close watch of oil pressure and oil temperatures. It has to operate the valvetrain in a seamless manner, hence the thinner viscosities for fast actuator changes.
To keep the anxiety levels down, the gauge is no longer marked in gradients or values. You have a 'band of normal'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Just wondering, I snagged the pic below off the internet, where the needle is at in the picture is usually what mine has been running. Just curious if thats normal? The chrysler 300 I had before this the needle never went past 1/4th, and thats usually what it ran at. My 3.6l v6 200 always runs right under 1/2 and yesterday it went a hair over. Seems hot? Or just normal? What does your's usually run at?



View attachment 1562
Just coming across this. My 2012 has the arrow on the line between normal and H often when I am driving. Even if it is under 55 mph. Noticed this after I had a hose replaced. My gut tells me something isn’t right.
 

·
Administrator
2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
Joined
·
2,077 Posts
Welcome to the forum. Check a few things: Was a cooling system flush performed at the same time that the hose was replaced? Was the correct coolant used and diluted to 50/50 with soft or distilled water? It should be a HOAT coolant (or equivalent) meeting Chrysler MS-9763.
Any gurgling or bubbling noises?
Remove the radiator cap when cool. Do you see scum or debris floating on top of the coolant?
If so, a reverse-flush may purge a restricted radiator of soft debris or replace the radiator if it has hard scale build-up that can't be flushed.
If the hose blew & the car overheated, it could have stressed the thermostat. Was that replaced?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
No the hose didn’t blow. I just noticed that when my car idled the heat turned cool. The garage said coolant was low and found that the clamp holding the hose was corroded and had a bit of a leak, so they replaced that. I also told them about the proper coolant and even brought my own to use. But I noticed that maybe it may have needed more than the jug I brought because I saw on the invoice they added a Sunoco brand. Makes me wonder if it was mixed together. Nothing said about a flush.
 

·
Administrator
2016 Chrysler 200 S, 1998 Sebring JX
Joined
·
2,077 Posts
Is there a 'part number' on the invoice for the Sunoco brand?
Mixing non-compatible coolants can cause issues. I think Chrysler went to OAT coolant in 2013. It would have a caution label or print on the reservoir cap under the hood about what type to use.
If there are any doubts, drain, flush & refill. See if that brings the operating temperature down?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
Heat running cool at idle indicates low coolant or an air bubble in the system. The temp gauge reading high at times when under 55 can also be caused by an air bubble. When the engine is cold, is the coolant level under the radiator cap at the top of the tube?

Where does the temp gauge read while driving around town, that is under 45 mph? A restricted radiator typically begins to show up at speeds 55+mph where airflow through the radiator is not enough to remove sufficient heat from the engine. Is it possible the radiator has crud on the fins restricting the airflow?

I have found a failing radiator cap may not hold the proper pressure or may not hold the needed vacuum to pull coolant from the reservoir to keep the cooling system full at all times.. It is cheap enough to replace the radiator cap to rule it out. My preference is OEM.

A 2012 OEM HOAT coolant life is 5 years/100000 miles. A cooling system flush may be in order.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Heat running cool at idle indicates low coolant or an air bubble in the system. The temp gauge reading high at times when under 55 can also be caused by an air bubble. When the engine is cold, is the coolant level under the radiator cap at the top of the tube?

Where does the temp gauge read while driving around town, that is under 45 mph? A restricted radiator typically begins to show up at speeds 55+mph where airflow through the radiator is not enough to remove sufficient heat from the engine. Is it possible the radiator has crud on the fins restricting the airflow?

I have found a failing radiator cap may not hold the proper pressure or may not hold the needed vacuum to pull coolant from the reservoir to keep the cooling system full at all times.. It is cheap enough to replace the radiator cap to rule it out. My preference is OEM.

A 2012 OEM HOAT coolant life is 5 years/100000 miles. A cooling system flush may be in order.
Thanks, it all makes sense. My car has 173000 on it. But honestly only one major repair and that was the usual Chrysler 200 complaint of no heat on passenger side in which the heater cord was replaced. So far only the usual maintenance, oil changes, brakes, filters…so consider myself lucky. I keep up on any “weirdness” with the car in regard to sound or driving differences. So a flush may be needed.
 
21 - 30 of 30 Posts
Top